Publications

2021
Xu J, Abaci Turk E, Gagoski B, Golland P, Grant EP, Adalsteinsson E. Motion Analysis in Fetal MRI using Deep Pose Estimator. Proc Int Soc Magn Reson Med Sci Meet Exhib Int Soc Magn Reson Med Sci Meet Exhib. 2021;29.
de Almeida Martins JP, Nilsson M, Lampinen B, Palombo M, While PT, Westin C-F, Szczepankiewicz F. Neural Networks for Parameter Estimation in Microstructural MRI: Application to a Diffusion-Relaxation Model of White Matter. Neuroimage. 2021;244 :118601.Abstract
Specific features of white matter microstructure can be investigated by using biophysical models to interpret relaxation-diffusion MRI brain data. Although more intricate models have the potential to reveal more details of the tissue, they also incur time-consuming parameter estimation that may converge to inaccurate solutions due to a prevalence of local minima in a degenerate fitting landscape. Machine-learning fitting algorithms have been proposed to accelerate the parameter estimation and increase the robustness of the attained estimates. So far, learning-based fitting approaches have been restricted to microstructural models with a reduced number of independent model parameters where dense sets of training data are easy to generate. Moreover, the degree to which machine learning can alleviate the degeneracy problem is poorly understood. For conventional least-squares solvers, it has been shown that degeneracy can be avoided by acquisition with optimized relaxation-diffusion-correlation protocols that include tensor-valued diffusion encoding. Whether machine-learning techniques can offset these acquisition requirements remains to be tested. In this work, we employ artificial neural networks to vastly accelerate the parameter estimation for a recently introduced relaxation-diffusion model of white matter microstructure. We also develop strategies for assessing the accuracy and sensitivity of function fitting networks and use those strategies to explore the impact of the acquisition protocol. The developed learning-based fitting pipelines were tested on relaxation-diffusion data acquired with optimal and sub-optimal acquisition protocols. Networks trained with an optimized protocol were observed to provide accurate parameter estimates within short computational times. Comparing neural networks and least-squares solvers, we found the performance of the former to be less affected by sub-optimal protocols; however, model fitting networks were still susceptible to degeneracy issues and their use could not fully replace a careful design of the acquisition protocol.
Levitt JJ, Zhang F, Vangel M, Nestor PG, Rathi Y, Kubicki M, Shenton ME, O'Donnell LJ. The Organization of Frontostriatal Brain Wiring in Healthy Subjects Using a Novel Diffusion Imaging Fiber Cluster Analysis. Cereb Cortex. 2021;31 (12) :5308-5318.Abstract
To assess normal organization of frontostriatal brain wiring, we analyzed diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) scans in 100 young adult healthy subjects (HSs). We identified fiber clusters intersecting the frontal cortex and caudate, a core component of associative striatum, and quantified their degree of deviation from a strictly topographic pattern. Using whole brain dMRI tractography and an automated tract parcellation clustering method, we extracted 17 white matter fiber clusters per hemisphere connecting the frontal cortex and caudate. In a novel approach to quantify the geometric relationship among clusters, we measured intercluster endpoint distances between corresponding cluster pairs in the frontal cortex and caudate. We show first, the overall frontal cortex wiring pattern of the caudate deviates from a strictly topographic organization due to significantly greater convergence in regionally specific clusters; second, these significantly convergent clusters originate in subregions of ventrolateral, dorsolateral, and orbitofrontal prefrontal cortex (PFC); and, third, a similar organization in both hemispheres. Using a novel tractography method, we find PFC-caudate brain wiring in HSs deviates from a strictly topographic organization due to a regionally specific pattern of cluster convergence. We conjecture cortical subregions projecting to the caudate with greater convergence subserve functions that benefit from greater circuit integration.
Herberthson M, Boito D, Dela Haije T, Feragen A, Westin C-F, Özarslan E. Q-Space Trajectory Imaging With Positivity Constraints (QTI+). Neuroimage. 2021;238 :118198.Abstract
Q-space trajectory imaging (QTI) enables the estimation of useful scalar measures indicative of the local tissue structure. This is accomplished by employing generalized gradient waveforms for diffusion sensitization alongside a diffusion tensor distribution (DTD) model. The first two moments of the underlying DTD are made available by acquisitions at low diffusion sensitivity (b-values). Here, we show that three independent conditions have to be fulfilled by the mean and covariance tensors associated with distributions of symmetric positive semidefinite tensors. We introduce an estimation framework utilizing semi-definite programming (SDP) to guarantee that these conditions are met. Applying the framework on simulated signal profiles for diffusion tensors distributed according to non-central Wishart distributions demonstrates the improved noise resilience of QTI+ over the commonly employed estimation methods. Our findings on a human brain data set also reveal pronounced improvements, especially so for acquisition protocols featuring few number of volumes. Our method's robustness to noise is expected to not only improve the accuracy of the estimates, but also enable a meaningful interpretation of contrast in the derived scalar maps. The technique's performance on shorter acquisitions could make it feasible in routine clinical practice.
Hsu T-MH, Schawkat K, Berkowitz SJ, Wei JL, Makoyeva A, Legare K, DeCicco C, Paez NS, Wu JSH, Szolovits P, et al. Artificial Intelligence to Assess Body Composition on Routine Abdominal CT Scans and Predict Mortality in Pancreatic Cancer- a Recipe for Your Local Application. Eur J Radiol. 2021;142 :109834.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Body composition is associated with mortality; however its routine assessment is too time-consuming. PURPOSE: To demonstrate the value of artificial intelligence (AI) to extract body composition measures from routine studies, we aimed to develop a fully automated AI approach to measure fat and muscles masses, to validate its clinical discriminatory value, and to provide the code, training data and workflow solutions to facilitate its integration into local practice. METHODS: We developed a neural network that quantified the tissue components at the L3 vertebral body level using data from the Liver Tumor Challenge (LiTS) and a pancreatic cancer cohort. We classified sarcopenia using accepted skeletal muscle index cut-offs and visceral fat based its median value. We used Kaplan Meier curves and Cox regression analysis to assess the association between these measures and mortality. RESULTS: Applying the algorithm trained on LiTS data to the local cohort yielded good agreement [>0.8 intraclass correlation (ICC)]; when trained on both datasets, it had excellent agreement (>0.9 ICC). The pancreatic cancer cohort had 136 patients (mean age: 67 ± 11 years; 54% women); 15% had sarcopenia; mean visceral fat was 142 cm2. Concurrent with prior research, we found a significant association between sarcopenia and mortality [mean survival of 15 ± 12 vs. 22 ± 12 (p < 0.05), adjusted HR of 1.58 (95% CI: 1.03-3.33)] but no association between visceral fat and mortality. The detector analysis took 1 ± 0.5 s. CONCLUSIONS: AI body composition analysis can provide meaningful imaging biomarkers from routine exams demonstrating AI's ability to further enhance the clinical value of radiology reports.
Novello L, Agarwal N, Vennarini S, Lorentini S, Zacà D, Mussano A, Pasternak O, Jovicich J. Longitudinal Changes in Brain Diffusion MRI Indices during and after Proton Beam Therapy in a Child with Pilocytic Astrocytoma: A Case Report. Diagnostics (Basel). 2021;12 (1) :26.Abstract
Proton beam therapy (PBT) is an effective pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, the resulting microstructural changes within and around irradiated tumors are unknown. We retrospectively applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and free-water imaging (FWI) on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data to monitor microstructural changes during the PBT and after 8 months in a pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). We evaluated the conventional MRI- and dMRI-derived indices from six MRI sessions (t0-t5) in a Caucasian child with a hypothalamic PA: at baseline (t0), during the PBT (t1-t4) and after 8 months (t5). The tumor voxels were classified as "solid" or "fluid" based on the FWI. While the tumor volume remained stable during the PBT, the dMRI analyses identified two different response patterns: (i) an increase in fluid content and diffusivity with anisotropy reductions in the solid voxels at t1, followed by (ii) smaller variations in fluid content but higher anisotropy in the solid voxels at t2-t4. At follow-up (t5), the tumor volume, fluid content, and diffusivity in the solid voxels increased. The NAWM showed dose-dependent microstructural changes. The use of the dMRI and FWI showed complex dynamic microstructural changes in the irradiated mass during the PBT and at follow-up, opening new avenues in our understanding of radiation-induced pathophysiologic mechanisms in tumors and the surrounding tissues.
Ye Y, Barapatre S, Davis MK, Elliston KO, Davatzikos C, Fedorov A, Fillion-Robin J-C, Foster I, Gilbertson JR, Lasso A, et al. Open-source Software Sustainability Models: Initial White Paper From the Informatics Technology for Cancer Research Sustainability and Industry Partnership Working Group. J Med Internet Res. 2021;23 (12) :e20028.Abstract
BACKGROUND: The National Cancer Institute Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR) program provides a series of funding mechanisms to create an ecosystem of open-source software (OSS) that serves the needs of cancer research. As the ITCR ecosystem substantially grows, it faces the challenge of the long-term sustainability of the software being developed by ITCR grantees. To address this challenge, the ITCR sustainability and industry partnership working group (SIP-WG) was convened in 2019. OBJECTIVE: The charter of the SIP-WG is to investigate options to enhance the long-term sustainability of the OSS being developed by ITCR, in part by developing a collection of business model archetypes that can serve as sustainability plans for ITCR OSS development initiatives. The working group assembled models from the ITCR program, from other studies, and from the engagement of its extensive network of relationships with other organizations (eg, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, Open Source Initiative, and Software Sustainability Institute) in support of this objective. METHODS: This paper reviews the existing sustainability models and describes 10 OSS use cases disseminated by the SIP-WG and others, including 3D Slicer, Bioconductor, Cytoscape, Globus, i2b2 (Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside) and tranSMART, Insight Toolkit, Linux, Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics tools, R, and REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), in 10 sustainability aspects: governance, documentation, code quality, support, ecosystem collaboration, security, legal, finance, marketing, and dependency hygiene. RESULTS: Information available to the public reveals that all 10 OSS have effective governance, comprehensive documentation, high code quality, reliable dependency hygiene, strong user and developer support, and active marketing. These OSS include a variety of licensing models (eg, general public license version 2, general public license version 3, Berkeley Software Distribution, and Apache 3) and financial models (eg, federal research funding, industry and membership support, and commercial support). However, detailed information on ecosystem collaboration and security is not publicly provided by most OSS. CONCLUSIONS: We recommend 6 essential attributes for research software: alignment with unmet scientific needs, a dedicated development team, a vibrant user community, a feasible licensing model, a sustainable financial model, and effective product management. We also stress important actions to be considered in future ITCR activities that involve the discussion of the sustainability and licensing models for ITCR OSS, the establishment of a central library, the allocation of consulting resources to code quality control, ecosystem collaboration, security, and dependency hygiene.
Behjat H, Westin C-F, Aganj I. Cortical Surface-Informed Volumetric Spatial Smoothing of fMRI Data via Graph Signal Processing. Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2021;2021 :3804-8.Abstract
Conventionally, as a preprocessing step, functional MRI (fMRI) data are spatially smoothed before further analysis, be it for activation mapping on task-based fMRI or functional connectivity analysis on resting-state fMRI data. When images are smoothed volumetrically, however, isotropic Gaussian kernels are generally used, which do not adapt to the underlying brain structure. Alternatively, cortical surface smoothing procedures provide the benefit of adapting the smoothing process to the underlying morphology, but require projecting volumetric data on to the surface. In this paper, leveraging principles from graph signal processing, we propose a volumetric spatial smoothing method that takes advantage of the gray-white and pial cortical surfaces, and as such, adapts the filtering process to the underlying morphological details at each point in the cortex.
Schilling KG, Rheault F, Petit L, Hansen CB, Nath V, Yeh F-C, Girard G, Barakovic M, Rafael-Patino J, Yu T, et al. Tractography Dissection Variability: What Happens When 42 Groups Dissect 14 White Matter Bundles on the Same Dataset?. Neuroimage. 2021;243 :118502.Abstract
White matter bundle segmentation using diffusion MRI fiber tractography has become the method of choice to identify white matter fiber pathways in vivo in human brains. However, like other analyses of complex data, there is considerable variability in segmentation protocols and techniques. This can result in different reconstructions of the same intended white matter pathways, which directly affects tractography results, quantification, and interpretation. In this study, we aim to evaluate and quantify the variability that arises from different protocols for bundle segmentation. Through an open call to users of fiber tractography, including anatomists, clinicians, and algorithm developers, 42 independent teams were given processed sets of human whole-brain streamlines and asked to segment 14 white matter fascicles on six subjects. In total, we received 57 different bundle segmentation protocols, which enabled detailed volume-based and streamline-based analyses of agreement and disagreement among protocols for each fiber pathway. Results show that even when given the exact same sets of underlying streamlines, the variability across protocols for bundle segmentation is greater than all other sources of variability in the virtual dissection process, including variability within protocols and variability across subjects. In order to foster the use of tractography bundle dissection in routine clinical settings, and as a fundamental analytical tool, future endeavors must aim to resolve and reduce this heterogeneity. Although external validation is needed to verify the anatomical accuracy of bundle dissections, reducing heterogeneity is a step towards reproducible research and may be achieved through the use of standard nomenclature and definitions of white matter bundles and well-chosen constraints and decisions in the dissection process.
Di Biase MA, Cetin-Karayumak S, Lyall AE, Zalesky A, Cho KIK, Zhang F, Kubicki M, Rathi Y, Lyons MG, Bouix S, et al. White Matter Changes in Psychosis Risk Relate to Development and Are Not Impacted by the Transition to Psychosis. Mol Psychiatry. 2021;26 (11) :6833-44.Abstract
Subtle alterations in white matter microstructure are observed in youth at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. However, the timing of these changes and their relationships to the emergence of psychosis remain unclear. Here, we track the evolution of white matter abnormalities in a large, longitudinal cohort of CHR individuals comprising the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS-3). Multi-shell diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data were collected across multiple timepoints (1-5 over 1 year) in 286 subjects (aged 12-32 years): 25 CHR individuals who transitioned to psychosis (CHR-P; 61 scans), 205 CHR subjects with unknown transition outcome after the 1-year follow-up period (CHR-U; 596 scans), and 56 healthy controls (195 scans). Linear mixed effects models were fitted to infer the impact of age and illness-onset on variation in the fractional anisotropy of cellular tissue (FAT) and the volume fraction of extracellular free water (FW). Baseline measures of white matter microstructure did not differentiate between HC, CHR-U and CHR-P individuals. However, age trajectories differed between the three groups in line with a developmental effect: CHR-P and CHR-U groups displayed higher FAT in adolescence, and 4% lower FAT by 30 years of age compared to controls. Furthermore, older CHR-P subjects (20+ years) displayed 4% higher FW in the forceps major (p < 0.05). Prospective analysis in CHR-P did not reveal a significant impact of illness onset on regional FAT or FW, suggesting that transition to psychosis is not marked by dramatic change in white matter microstructure. Instead, clinical high risk for psychosis-regardless of transition outcome-is characterized by subtle age-related white matter changes that occur in tandem with development.
Fichtinger G, Mousavi P, Ungi T, Fenster A, Abolmaesumi P, Kronreif G, Ruiz-Alzola J, Ndoye A, Diao B, Kikinis R. Design of an Ultrasound-Navigated Prostate Cancer Biopsy System for Nationwide Implementation in Senegal. J Imaging. 2021;7 (8) :154.Abstract
This paper presents the design of NaviPBx, an ultrasound-navigated prostate cancer biopsy system. NaviPBx is designed to support an affordable and sustainable national healthcare program in Senegal. It uses spatiotemporal navigation and multiparametric transrectal ultrasound to guide biopsies. NaviPBx integrates concepts and methods that have been independently validated previously in clinical feasibility studies and deploys them together in a practical prostate cancer biopsy system. NaviPBx is based entirely on free open-source software and will be shared as a free open-source program with no restriction on its use. NaviPBx is set to be deployed and sustained nationwide through the Senegalese Military Health Service. This paper reports on the results of the design process of NaviPBx. Our approach concentrates on "frugal technology", intended to be affordable for low-middle income (LMIC) countries. Our project promises the wide-scale application of prostate biopsy and will foster time-efficient development and programmatic implementation of ultrasound-guided diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in Senegal and beyond.
Slator PJ, Palombo M, Miller KL, Westin C-F, Laun F, Kim D, Haldar JP, Benjamini D, Lemberskiy G, de Almeida Martins JP, et al. Combined Diffusion-Relaxometry Microstructure Imaging: Current Status and Future Prospects. Magn Reson Med. 2021;86 (6) :2987-3011.Abstract
Microstructure imaging seeks to noninvasively measure and map microscopic tissue features by pairing mathematical modeling with tailored MRI protocols. This article reviews an emerging paradigm that has the potential to provide a more detailed assessment of tissue microstructure-combined diffusion-relaxometry imaging. Combined diffusion-relaxometry acquisitions vary multiple MR contrast encodings-such as b-value, gradient direction, inversion time, and echo time-in a multidimensional acquisition space. When paired with suitable analysis techniques, this enables quantification of correlations and coupling between multiple MR parameters-such as diffusivity, T 1 , T 2 , and T 2 ∗ . This opens the possibility of disentangling multiple tissue compartments (within voxels) that are indistinguishable with single-contrast scans, enabling a new generation of microstructural maps with improved biological sensitivity and specificity.
Iglesias JE, Billot B, Balbastre Y, Tabari A, Conklin J, Gilberto González R, Alexander DC, Golland P, Edlow BL, Fischl B, et al. Joint Super-Resolution and Synthesis of 1 Mm Isotropic MP-RAGE Volumes From Clinical MRI Exams With Scans of Different Orientation, Resolution and Contrast. Neuroimage. 2021;237 :118206.Abstract
Most existing algorithms for automatic 3D morphometry of human brain MRI scans are designed for data with near-isotropic voxels at approximately 1 mm resolution, and frequently have contrast constraints as well-typically requiring T1-weighted images (e.g., MP-RAGE scans). This limitation prevents the analysis of millions of MRI scans acquired with large inter-slice spacing in clinical settings every year. In turn, the inability to quantitatively analyze these scans hinders the adoption of quantitative neuro imaging in healthcare, and also precludes research studies that could attain huge sample sizes and hence greatly improve our understanding of the human brain. Recent advances in convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are producing outstanding results in super-resolution and contrast synthesis of MRI. However, these approaches are very sensitive to the specific combination of contrast, resolution and orientation of the input images, and thus do not generalize to diverse clinical acquisition protocols - even within sites. In this article, we present SynthSR, a method to train a CNN that receives one or more scans with spaced slices, acquired with different contrast, resolution and orientation, and produces an isotropic scan of canonical contrast (typically a 1 mm MP-RAGE). The presented method does not require any preprocessing, beyond rigid coregistration of the input scans. Crucially, SynthSR trains on synthetic input images generated from 3D segmentations, and can thus be used to train CNNs for any combination of contrasts, resolutions and orientations without high-resolution real images of the input contrasts. We test the images generated with SynthSR in an array of common downstream analyses, and show that they can be reliably used for subcortical segmentation and volumetry, image registration (e.g., for tensor-based morphometry), and, if some image quality requirements are met, even cortical thickness morphometry. The source code is publicly available at https://github.com/BBillot/SynthSR.
Steinmann S, Lyall AE, Langhein M, Nägele FL, Rauh J, Cetin-Karayumak S, Zhang F, Mussmann M, Billah T, Makris N, et al. Sex-Related Differences in White Matter Asymmetry and Its Implications for Verbal Working Memory in Psychosis High-Risk State. Front Psychiatry. 2021;12 :686967.Abstract
Objective: Sexual dimorphism has been investigated in schizophrenia, although sex-specific differences among individuals who are at clinical high-risk (CHR) for developing psychosis have been inconclusive. This study aims to characterize sexual dimorphism of language areas in the brain by investigating the asymmetry of four white matter tracts relevant to verbal working memory in CHR patients compared to healthy controls (HC). HC typically show a leftward asymmetry of these tracts. Moreover, structural abnormalities in asymmetry and verbal working memory dysfunctions have been associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities and are considered core features of schizophrenia. Methods: Twenty-nine subjects with CHR (17 female/12 male) for developing psychosis and twenty-one HC (11 female/10 male) matched for age, sex, and education were included in the study. Two-tensor unscented Kalman filter tractography, followed by an automated, atlas-guided fiber clustering approach, were used to identify four fiber tracts related to verbal working memory: the superior longitudinal fasciculi (SLF) I, II and III, and the superior occipitofrontal fasciculus (SOFF). Using fractional anisotropy (FA) of tissue as the primary measure, we calculated the laterality index for each tract. Results: There was a significantly greater right>left asymmetry of the SLF-III in CHR females compared to HC females, but no hemispheric difference between CHR vs. HC males. Moreover, the laterality index of SLF-III for CHR females correlated negatively with Backward Digit Span performance, suggesting a greater rightward asymmetry was associated with poorer working memory functioning. Conclusion: This study suggests increased rightward asymmetry of the SLF-III in CHR females. This finding of sexual dimorphism in white matter asymmetry in a language-related area of the brain in CHR highlights the need for a deeper understanding of the role of sex in the high-risk state. Future work investigating early sex-specific pathophysiological mechanisms, may lead to the development of novel personalized treatment strategies aimed at preventing transition to a more chronic and difficult-to-treat disorder.
Bastos DCDA, Juvekar P, Tie Y, Jowkar N, Pieper S, Wells WM, Bi WL, Golby A, Frisken S, Kapur T. Challenges and Opportunities of Intraoperative 3D Ultrasound With Neuronavigation in Relation to Intraoperative MRI. Front Oncol. 2021;11 :656519.Abstract
Introduction: Neuronavigation greatly improves the surgeons ability to approach, assess and operate on brain tumors, but tends to lose its accuracy as the surgery progresses and substantial brain shift and deformation occurs. Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) can partially address this problem but is resource intensive and workflow disruptive. Intraoperative ultrasound (iUS) provides real-time information that can be used to update neuronavigation and provide real-time information regarding the resection progress. We describe the intraoperative use of 3D iUS in relation to iMRI, and discuss the challenges and opportunities in its use in neurosurgical practice. Methods: We performed a retrospective evaluation of patients who underwent image-guided brain tumor resection in which both 3D iUS and iMRI were used. The study was conducted between June 2020 and December 2020 when an extension of a commercially available navigation software was introduced in our practice enabling 3D iUS volumes to be reconstructed from tracked 2D iUS images. For each patient, three or more 3D iUS images were acquired during the procedure, and one iMRI was acquired towards the end. The iUS images included an extradural ultrasound sweep acquired before dural incision (iUS-1), a post-dural opening iUS (iUS-2), and a third iUS acquired immediately before the iMRI acquisition (iUS-3). iUS-1 and preoperative MRI were compared to evaluate the ability of iUS to visualize tumor boundaries and critical anatomic landmarks; iUS-3 and iMRI were compared to evaluate the ability of iUS for predicting residual tumor. Results: Twenty-three patients were included in this study. Fifteen patients had tumors located in eloquent or near eloquent brain regions, the majority of patients had low grade gliomas (11), gross total resection was achieved in 12 patients, postoperative temporary deficits were observed in five patients. In twenty-two iUS was able to define tumor location, tumor margins, and was able to indicate relevant landmarks for orientation and guidance. In sixteen cases, white matter fiber tracts computed from preoperative dMRI were overlaid on the iUS images. In nineteen patients, the EOR (GTR or STR) was predicted by iUS and confirmed by iMRI. The remaining four patients where iUS was not able to evaluate the presence or absence of residual tumor were recurrent cases with a previous surgical cavity that hindered good contact between the US probe and the brainsurface. Conclusion: This recent experience at our institution illustrates the practical benefits, challenges, and opportunities of 3D iUS in relation to iMRI.
Langbein BJ, Szczepankiewicz F, Westin C-F, Bay C, Maier SE, Kibel AS, Tempany CM, Fennessy FM. A Pilot Study of Multidimensional Diffusion MRI for Assessment of Tissue Heterogeneity in Prostate Cancer. Invest Radiol. 2021;56 (12) :845-53.Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this exploratory study were to investigate the feasibility of multidimensional diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MddMRI) in assessing diffusion heterogeneity at both a macroscopic and microscopic level in prostate cancer (PCa). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Informed consent was obtained from 46 subjects who underwent 3.0-T prostate multiparametric MRI, complemented with a prototype spin echo-based MddMRI sequence in this institutional review board-approved study. Prostate cancer tumors and comparative normal tissue from each patient were contoured on both apparent diffusion coefficient and MddMRI-derived mean diffusivity (MD) maps (from which microscopic diffusion heterogeneity [MKi] and microscopic diffusion anisotropy were derived) using 3D Slicer. The discriminative ability of MddMRI-derived parameters to differentiate PCa from normal tissue was determined using the Friedman test. To determine if tumor diffusion heterogeneity is similar on macroscopic and microscopic scales, the linear association between SD of MD and mean MKi was estimated using robust regression (bisquare weighting). Hypothesis testing was 2 tailed; P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: All MddMRI-derived parameters could distinguish tumor from normal tissue in the fixed-effects analysis (P < 0.0001). Tumor MKi was higher (P < 0.05) compared with normal tissue (median, 0.40; interquartile range, 0.29-0.52 vs 0.20-0.18; 0.25), as was tumor microscopic diffusion anisotropy (0.55; 0.36-0.81 vs 0.20-0.15; 0.28). The MKi could not be predicted (no significant association) by SD of MD. There was a significant correlation between tumor volume and SD of MD (R2 = 0.50, slope = 0.008 μm2/ms per millimeter, P < 0.001) but not between tumor volume and MKi. CONCLUSIONS: This explorative study demonstrates that MddMRI provides novel information on MKi and microscopic anisotropy, which differ from measures at the macroscopic level. MddMRI has the potential to characterize tumor tissue heterogeneity at different spatial scales.
Behjat H, Aganj I, Abramian D, Eklund A, Westin C-F. Characterization of Spatial Dynamics of Fmri Data in White Matter Using Diffusion-Informed White Matter Harmonics. Proc IEEE Int Symp Biomed Imaging. 2021;2021 :1586-90.Abstract
In this work, we leverage the Laplacian eigenbasis of voxel-wise white matter (WM) graphs derived from diffusion-weighted MRI data, dubbed WM harmonics, to characterize the spatial structure of WM fMRI data. Our motivation for such a characterization is based on studies that show WM fMRI data exhibit a spatial correlational anisotropy that coincides with underlying fiber patterns. By quantifying the energy content of WM fMRI data associated with subsets of WM harmonics across multiple spectral bands, we show that the data exhibits notable subtle spatial modulations under functional load that are not manifested during rest. WM harmonics provide a novel means to study the spatial dynamics of WM fMRI data, in such way that the analysis is informed by the underlying anatomical structure.
Horng S, Liao R, Wang X, Dalal S, Golland P, Berkowitz SJ. Deep Learning to Quantify Pulmonary Edema in Chest Radiographs. Radiol Artif Intell. 2021;3 (2) :e190228.Abstract
Purpose: To develop a machine learning model to classify the severity grades of pulmonary edema on chest radiographs. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 369 071 chest radiographs and associated radiology reports from 64 581 patients (mean age, 51.71 years; 54.51% women) from the MIMIC-CXR chest radiograph dataset were included. This dataset was split into patients with and without congestive heart failure (CHF). Pulmonary edema severity labels from the associated radiology reports were extracted from patients with CHF as four different ordinal levels: 0, no edema; 1, vascular congestion; 2, interstitial edema; and 3, alveolar edema. Deep learning models were developed using two approaches: a semisupervised model using a variational autoencoder and a pretrained supervised learning model using a dense neural network. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed on both models. Results: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for differentiating alveolar edema from no edema was 0.99 for the semisupervised model and 0.87 for the pretrained models. Performance of the algorithm was inversely related to the difficulty in categorizing milder states of pulmonary edema (shown as AUCs for semisupervised model and pretrained model, respectively): 2 versus 0, 0.88 and 0.81; 1 versus 0, 0.79 and 0.66; 3 versus 1, 0.93 and 0.82; 2 versus 1, 0.69 and 0.73; and 3 versus 2, 0.88 and 0.63. Conclusion: Deep learning models were trained on a large chest radiograph dataset and could grade the severity of pulmonary edema on chest radiographs with high performance.Supplemental material is available for this article.See also the commentary by Auffermann in this issue.© RSNA, 2021.
Wu C, Diao B, Ungi T, Sedghi A, Kikinis R, Mousavi P, Fichtinger G. Development of an Open-Source System for Prostate Biopsy Training in Senegal. SPIE Medical Imaging. 2021.Abstract

PURPOSE: Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed in men. The rate is disproportionately high among men in sub-Saharan Africa where, unlike in North America and Western Europe, the screening process for prostate cancer has historically not been routine. Currently, as awareness regarding prostate health increases, more patients in this region are being referred to trans-rectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, a diagnosis procedure which requires a strong understanding of prostate zonal anatomy. To aid in the instruction of this procedure, prostate biopsy training programs need to be implemented. Unfortunately, current TRUS-guided training tools are not ideal for reproducibility in these Western African countries. To answer this challenge, we are developing an affordable and open-source training simulator for TRUS-guided prostate biopsy, for use in Senegal.  In this paper, we present the implementation of the training simulator’s virtual interface, highlighting the generation and evaluation of the critical training component of zonal anatomy overlaid on TRUS.

METHODS: For the simulator’s dataset, we registered TRUS and MRI volumes together to obtain the zonal segmentation from the MRI volumes. After generating ten pairings of TRUS overlaid with zonal segmentation, we designed and implemented a virtual TRUS training system, developed in open-source software. The objective of our simulator is to teach trainees to accurately identify the prostate’s anatomical zones in TRUS. To confirm the system’s usability for training zonal identification, we conducted a two-part survey on the quality of the zonal overlays with 7 urology experts. In the first part, they assessed the zonal overlay for visual correctness by rating 10 images from one patient’s TRUS with registered overlay on a 5-point Likert scale. For the second part, they labelled 10 plain TRUS volumes with zonal anatomy and the labels were compared to the labels of our overlay.

RESULTS: On average, experts rated the zonal overlay’s visual accuracy at 4 out of 5. Furthermore, 7 out of 7 experts labelled the peripheral, anterior, and transitional zones in the same regions we overlaid them, and 5 out of 7 labelled the central zone in the same region we overlaid it.

CONCLUSION: We created the prototype of a TRUS imaging simulator in open-source software. A vital training component, zonal overlay, was generated using publicly accessible data and validated by expert urologists for prostate zone identification, confirming the concept.

Wu SPIE 2021.pdf Wu 2021 SPIE Poster.pdf
Guder S, Pasternak O, Gerloff C, Schulz R. Strengthened Structure-Function Relationships of the Corticospinal Tract by Free Water Correction After Stroke. Brain Commun. 2021;3 (2) :fcab034.Abstract
The corticospinal tract is the most intensively investigated tract of the human motor system in stroke rehabilitative research. Diffusion-tensor-imaging gives insights into its microstructure, and transcranial magnetic stimulation assesses its excitability. Previous data on the interrelationship between both measures are contradictory. Correlative or predictive models which associate them with motor outcome are incomplete. Free water correction has been developed to enhance diffusion-tensor-imaging by eliminating partial volume with extracellular water, which could improve capturing stroke-related microstructural alterations, thereby also improving structure-function relationships in clinical cohorts. In the present cross-sectional study, data of 18 chronic stroke patients and 17 healthy controls, taken from a previous study on cortico-cerebellar motor tracts, were re-analysed: The data included diffusion-tensor-imaging data quantifying corticospinal tract microstructure with and without free water correction, transcranial magnetic stimulation data assessing recruitment curve properties of motor evoked potentials and detailed clinical data. Linear regression modelling was used to interrelate corticospinal tract microstructure, recruitment curves properties and clinical scores. The main finding of the present study was that free water correction substantially strengthens structure-function associations in stroke patients: Specifically, our data evidenced a significant association between fractional anisotropy of the ipsilesional corticospinal tract and its excitability ( = 0.001, adj.  = 0.54), with free water correction explaining additional 20% in recruitment curve variability. For clinical scores, only free water correction leads to the reliable detection of significant correlations between ipsilesional corticospinal tract fractional anisotropy and residual grip ( = 0.001, adj.  = 0.70) and pinch force ( < 0.001, adj.  = 0.72). Finally, multimodal models can be improved by free water correction as well. This study evidences that corticospinal tract microstructure directly relates to its excitability in stroke patients. It also shows that unexplained variance in motor outcome is considerably reduced by free water correction arguing that it might serve as a powerful tool to improve existing models of structure-function associations and potentially also outcome prediction after stroke.

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