Publications

2020
Petrea Frid, M Drake, Anne-Katrin Giese, Johan Wasselius, Markus D Schirmer, Kathleen L Donahue, Lisa Cloonan, Robert Irie, Elissa C McIntosh, and Polina Golland. 3/2020. “Detailed Phenotyping of Posterior vs. Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke: A Multi-center MRI Study.” J Neurol, 267, 3, Pp. 649-58.Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Posterior circulation ischemic stroke (PCiS) constitutes 20-30% of ischemic stroke cases. Detailed information about differences between PCiS and anterior circulation ischemic stroke (ACiS) remains scarce. Such information might guide clinical decision making and prevention strategies. We studied risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes in PCiS vs. ACiS and lesion location on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in PCiS.

METHODS:

Out of 3,301 MRIs from 12 sites in the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), we included 2,381 cases with acute DWI lesions. The definition of ACiS or PCiS was based on lesion location. We compared the groups using Chi-squared and logistic regression.

RESULTS:

PCiS occurred in 718 (30%) patients and ACiS in 1663 (70%). Diabetes and male sex were more common in PCiS vs. ACiS (diabetes 27% vs. 23%, p < 0.05; male sex 68% vs. 58%, p < 0.001). Both were independently associated with PCiS (diabetes, OR = 1.29; 95% CI 1.04-1.61; male sex, OR = 1.46; 95% CI 1.21-1.78). ACiS more commonly had large artery atherosclerosis (25% vs. 20%, p < 0.01) and cardioembolic mechanisms (17% vs. 11%, p < 0.001) compared to PCiS. Small artery occlusion was more common in PCiS vs. ACiS (20% vs. 14%, p < 0.001). Small artery occlusion accounted for 47% of solitary brainstem infarctions.

CONCLUSION:

Ischemic stroke subtypes differ between the two phenotypes. Diabetes and male sex have a stronger association with PCiS than ACiS. Definitive MRI-based PCiS diagnosis aids etiological investigation and contributes additional insights into specific risk factors and mechanisms of injury in PCiS.

Ørjan Bergmann, Rafael Henriques, Carl-Fredrik Westin, and Ofer Pasternak. 3/2020. “Fast and Accurate Initialization of the Free-water Imaging Model Parameters from Multi-shell Diffusion MRI.” NMR Biomed, 33, 3, Pp. e4219.Abstract
Cerebrospinal fluid partial volume effect is a known bias in the estimation of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) parameters from diffusion MRI data. The Free-Water Imaging model for diffusion MRI data adds a second compartment to the DTI model, which explicitly accounts for the signal contribution of extracellular free-water, such as cerebrospinal fluid. As a result the DTI parameters obtained through the free-water model are corrected for partial volume effects, and thus better represent tissue microstructure. In addition, the model estimates the fractional volume of free-water, and can be used to monitor changes in the extracellular space. Under certain assumptions, the model can be estimated from single-shell diffusion MRI data. However, by using data from multi-shell diffusion acquisitions, these assumptions can be relaxed, and the fit becomes more robust. Nevertheless, fitting the model to multi-shell data requires high computational cost, with a non-linear iterative minimization, which has to be initialized close enough to the global minimum to avoid local minima and to robustly estimate the model parameters. Here we investigate the properties of the main initialization approaches that are currently being used, and suggest new fast approaches to improve the initial estimates of the model parameters. We show that our proposed approaches provide a fast and accurate initial approximation of the model parameters, which is very close to the final solution. We demonstrate that the proposed initializations improve the final outcome of non-linear model fitting.
Lipeng Ning, Borjan Gagoski, Filip Szczepankiewicz, Carl-Fredrik Westin, and Yogesh Rathi. 3/2020. “Joint RElaxation-Diffusion Imaging Moments to Probe Neurite Microstructure.” IEEE Trans Med Imaging, 39, 3, Pp. 668-677.Abstract
Joint relaxation-diffusion measurements can provide new insight about the tissue microstructural properties. Most recent methods have focused on inverting the Laplace transform to recover the joint distribution of relaxation-diffusion. However, as is well-known, this problem is notoriously ill-posed and numerically unstable. In this work, we address this issue by directly computing the joint moments of transverse relaxation rate and diffusivity, which can be robustly estimated. To zoom into different parts of the joint distribution, we further enhance our method by applying multiplicative filters to the joint probability density function of relaxation and diffusion and compute the corresponding moments. We propose an approach to use these moments to compute several novel scalar indices to characterize specific properties of the underlying tissue microstructure. Furthermore, for the first time, we propose an algorithm to estimate diffusion signals that are independent of echo time based on the moments of the marginal probability density function of diffusion. We demonstrate its utility in extracting tissue information not contaminated with multiple intra-voxel relaxation rates. We compare the performance of four types of filters that zoom into tissue components with different relaxation and diffusion properties and demonstrate it on an in-vivo human dataset. Experimental results show that these filters are able to characterize heterogeneous tissue microstructure. Moreover, the filtered diffusion signals are also able to distinguish fiber bundles with similar orientations but different relaxation rates. The proposed method thus allows to characterize the neural microstructure information in a robust and unique manner not possible using existing techniques.
Fan Zhang, Thomas Noh, Parikshit Juvekar, Sarah F Frisken, Laura Rigolo, Isaiah Norton, Tina Kapur, Sonia Pujol, William Wells, Alex Yarmarkovich, Gordon Kindlmann, Demian Wassermann, Raul San Jose Estepar, Yogesh Rathi, Ron Kikinis, Hans J Johnson, Carl-Fredrik Westin, Steve Pieper, Alexandra J Golby, and Lauren J O'Donnell. 3/2020. “SlicerDMRI: Diffusion MRI and Tractography Research Software for Brain Cancer Surgery Planning and Visualization.” JCO Clin Cancer Inform, 4, Pp. 299-309.Abstract
PURPOSE: We present SlicerDMRI, an open-source software suite that enables research using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI), the only modality that can map the white matter connections of the living human brain. SlicerDMRI enables analysis and visualization of dMRI data and is aimed at the needs of clinical research users. SlicerDMRI is built upon and deeply integrated with 3D Slicer, a National Institutes of Health-supported open-source platform for medical image informatics, image processing, and three-dimensional visualization. Integration with 3D Slicer provides many features of interest to cancer researchers, such as real-time integration with neuronavigation equipment, intraoperative imaging modalities, and multimodal data fusion. One key application of SlicerDMRI is in neurosurgery research, where brain mapping using dMRI can provide patient-specific maps of critical brain connections as well as insight into the tissue microstructure that surrounds brain tumors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this article, we focus on a demonstration of SlicerDMRI as an informatics tool to enable end-to-end dMRI analyses in two retrospective imaging data sets from patients with high-grade glioma. Analyses demonstrated here include conventional diffusion tensor analysis, advanced multifiber tractography, automated identification of critical fiber tracts, and integration of multimodal imagery with dMRI. RESULTS: We illustrate the ability of SlicerDMRI to perform both conventional and advanced dMRI analyses as well as to enable multimodal image analysis and visualization. We provide an overview of the clinical rationale for each analysis along with pointers to the SlicerDMRI tools used in each. CONCLUSION: SlicerDMRI provides open-source and clinician-accessible research software tools for dMRI analysis. SlicerDMRI is available for easy automated installation through the 3D Slicer Extension Manager.
Björn Lampinen, Filip Szczepankiewicz, Johan Mårtensson, Danielle van Westen, Oskar Hansson, Carl-Fredrik Westin, and Markus Nilsson. 3/2020. “Towards Unconstrained Compartment Modeling in White Matter Using Diffusion-Relaxation MRI with Tensor-Valued Diffusion Encoding.” Magn Reson Med.Abstract
PURPOSE: To optimize diffusion-relaxation MRI with tensor-valued diffusion encoding for precise estimation of compartment-specific fractions, diffusivities, and T values within a two-compartment model of white matter, and to explore the approach in vivo. METHODS: Sampling protocols featuring different b-values (b), b-tensor shapes (b ), and echo times (TE) were optimized using Cramér-Rao lower bounds (CRLB). Whole-brain data were acquired in children, adults, and elderly with white matter lesions. Compartment fractions, diffusivities, and T values were estimated in a model featuring two microstructural compartments represented by a "stick" and a "zeppelin." RESULTS: Precise parameter estimates were enabled by sampling protocols featuring seven or more "shells" with unique b/b /TE-combinations. Acquisition times were approximately 15 minutes. In white matter of adults, the "stick" compartment had a fraction of approximately 0.5 and, compared with the "zeppelin" compartment, featured lower isotropic diffusivities (0.6 vs. 1.3 μm /ms) but higher T values (85 vs. 65 ms). Children featured lower "stick" fractions (0.4). White matter lesions exhibited high "zeppelin" isotropic diffusivities (1.7 μm /ms) and T values (150 ms). CONCLUSIONS: Diffusion-relaxation MRI with tensor-valued diffusion encoding expands the set of microstructure parameters that can be precisely estimated and therefore increases their specificity to biological quantities.
Christian Wachinger, Matthew Toews, Georg Langs, William Wells, and Polina Golland. 2/2020. “Keypoint Transfer for Fast Whole-Body Segmentation.” IEEE Trans Med Imaging, 39, 2, Pp. 273-82.Abstract
We introduce an approach for image segmentation based on sparse correspondences between keypoints in testing and training images. Keypoints represent automatically identified distinctive image locations, where each keypoint correspondence suggests a transformation between images. We use these correspondences to transfer label maps of entire organs from the training images to the test image. The keypoint transfer algorithm includes three steps: (i) keypoint matching, (ii) voting-based keypoint labeling, and (iii) keypoint-based probabilistic transfer of organ segmentations. We report segmentation results for abdominal organs in whole-body CT and MRI, as well as in contrast-enhanced CT and MRI. Our method offers a speed-up of about three orders of magnitude in comparison to common multi-atlas segmentation, while achieving an accuracy that compares favorably. Moreover, keypoint transfer does not require the registration to an atlas or a training phase. Finally, the method allows for the segmentation of scans with highly variable field-of-view.
Samo Lasič, Filip Szczepankiewicz, Erica Dall'Armellina, Arka Das, Christopher Kelly, Sven Plein, Jürgen E Schneider, Markus Nilsson, and Irvin Teh. 2/2020. “Motion-compensated b-tensor Encoding for in vivo Cardiac Diffusion-weighted Imaging.” NMR Biomed, 33, 2, Pp. e4213.Abstract
Motion is a major confound in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the body, and it is a common cause of image artefacts. The effects are particularly severe in cardiac applications, due to the nonrigid cyclical deformation of the myocardium. Spin echo-based DWI commonly employs gradient moment-nulling techniques to desensitise the acquisition to velocity and acceleration, ie, nulling gradient moments up to the 2nd order (M2-nulled). However, current M2-nulled DWI scans are limited to encode diffusion along a single direction at a time. We propose a method for designing b-tensors of arbitrary shapes, including planar, spherical, prolate and oblate tensors, while nulling gradient moments up to the 2nd order and beyond. The design strategy comprises initialising the diffusion encoding gradients in two encoding blocks about the refocusing pulse, followed by appropriate scaling and rotation, which further enables nulling undesired effects of concomitant gradients. Proof-of-concept assessment of in vivo mean diffusivity (MD) was performed using linear and spherical tensor encoding (LTE and STE, respectively) in the hearts of five healthy volunteers. The results of the M2-nulled STE showed that (a) the sequence was robust to cardiac motion, and (b) MD was higher than that acquired using standard M2-nulled LTE, where diffusion-weighting was applied in three orthogonal directions, which may be attributed to the presence of restricted diffusion and microscopic diffusion anisotropy. Provided adequate signal-to-noise ratio, STE could significantly shorten estimation of MD compared with the conventional LTE approach. Importantly, our theoretical analysis and the proposed gradient waveform design may be useful in microstructure imaging beyond diffusion tensor imaging where the effects of motion must be suppressed.
Maria Angelique Di Biase, Fan Zhang, Amanda Lyall, Marek Kubicki, René CW Mandl, Iris E Sommer, and Ofer Pasternak. 2/2020. “Neuroimaging Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Schizophrenia Patient and Healthy Populations.” Psychol Med, 50, 3, Pp. 403-12.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are a cardinal feature of schizophrenia, but they can also appear in otherwise healthy individuals. Imaging studies implicate language networks in the generation of AVH; however, it remains unclear if alterations reflect biologic substrates of AVH, irrespective of diagnostic status, age, or illness-related factors. We applied multimodal imaging to identify AVH-specific pathology, evidenced by overlapping gray or white matter deficits between schizophrenia patients and healthy voice-hearers. METHODS: Diffusion-weighted and T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired in 35 schizophrenia patients with AVH (SCZ-AVH), 32 healthy voice-hearers (H-AVH), and 40 age- and sex-matched controls without AVH. White matter fractional anisotropy (FA) and gray matter thickness (GMT) were computed for each region comprising ICBM-DTI and Desikan-Killiany atlases, respectively. Regions were tested for significant alterations affecting both SCZ-AVH and H-AVH groups, relative to controls. RESULTS: Compared with controls, the SCZ-AVH showed widespread FA and GMT reductions; but no significant differences emerged between H-AVH and control groups. While no overlapping pathology appeared in the overall study groups, younger (<40 years) H-AVH and SCZ-AVH subjects displayed overlapping FA deficits across four regions (p < 0.05): the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, as well as the anterior limbs of the internal capsule. Analyzing these regions with free-water imaging ascribed overlapping FA abnormalities to tissue-specific anisotropy changes. CONCLUSIONS: We identified white matter pathology associated with the presence of AVH, independent of diagnostic status. However, commonalities were constrained to younger and more homogenous groups, after reducing pathologic variance associated with advancing age and chronicity effects.
Christian Herz, Kemal Tuncali, Andriy Fedorov, Kyle MacNeil, Peter A Behringer, Junichi Tokuda, Alireza Mehrtash, Parvin Mousavi, Ron Kikinis, Fiona M Fennessy, and Clare M Tempany. 2/2020. “Open Source Platform for Transperineal In-Bore MRI-Guided Targeted Prostate Biopsy.” IEEE Trans Biomed Eng, 67, 2, Pp. 565-76.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Accurate biopsy sampling of the suspected lesions is critical for the diagnosis and clinical management of prostate cancer. Transperineal in-bore MRI-guided prostate biopsy (tpMRgBx) is a targeted biopsy technique that was shown to be safe, efficient, and accurate. Our goal was to develop an open source software platform to support evaluation, refinement, and translation of this biopsy approach. METHODS: We developed SliceTracker, a 3D Slicer extension to support tpMRgBx. We followed modular design of the implementation to enable customization of the interface and interchange of image segmentation and registration components to assess their effect on the processing time, precision, and accuracy of the biopsy needle placement. The platform and supporting documentation were developed to enable the use of software by an operator with minimal technical training to facilitate translation. Retrospective evaluation studied registration accuracy, effect of the prostate segmentation approach, and re-identification time of biopsy targets. Prospective evaluation focused on the total procedure time and biopsy targeting error (BTE). RESULTS: Evaluation utilized data from 73 retrospective and ten prospective tpMRgBx cases. Mean landmark registration error for retrospective evaluation was 1.88 ± 2.63 mm, and was not sensitive to the approach used for prostate gland segmentation. Prospectively, we observed target re-identification time of 4.60 ± 2.40 min and BTE of 2.40 ± 0.98 mm. CONCLUSION: SliceTracker is modular and extensible open source platform for supporting image processing aspects of the tpMRgBx procedure. It has been successfully utilized to support clinical research procedures at our site.
Guoqiang Xie, Fan Zhang, Laura Leung, Michael A Mooney, Lorenz Epprecht, Isaiah Norton, Yogesh Rathi, Ron Kikinis, Ossama Al-Mefty, Nikos Makris, Alexandra J Golby, and Lauren J O'Donnell. 1/2020. “Anatomical Assessment of Trigeminal Nerve Tractography Using Diffusion MRI: A Comparison of Acquisition B-Values and Single- and Multi-Fiber Tracking Strategies.” Neuroimage Clin, 25, Pp. 102160.Abstract
BACKGROUND: The trigeminal nerve (TGN) is the largest cranial nerve and can be involved in multiple inflammatory, compressive, ischemic or other pathologies. Currently, imaging-based approaches to identify the TGN mostly rely on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provides localization of the cisternal portion of the TGN where the contrast between nerve and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is high enough to allow differentiation. The course of the TGN within the brainstem as well as anterior to the cisternal portion, however, is more difficult to display on traditional imaging sequences. An advanced imaging technique, diffusion MRI (dMRI), enables tracking of the trajectory of TGN fibers and has the potential to visualize anatomical regions of the TGN not seen on T2-weighted imaging. This may allow a more comprehensive assessment of the nerve in the context of pathology. To date, most work in TGN tracking has used clinical dMRI acquisitions with a b-value of 1000 s/mm and conventional diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) tractography methods. Though higher b-value acquisitions and multi-tensor tractography methods are known to be beneficial for tracking brain white matter fiber tracts, there have been no studies conducted to evaluate the performance of these advanced approaches on nerve tracking of the TGN, in particular on tracking different anatomical regions of the TGN. OBJECTIVE: We compare TGN tracking performance using dMRI data with different b-values, in combination with both single- and multi-tensor tractography methods. Our goal is to assess the advantages and limitations of these different strategies for identifying the anatomical regions of the TGN. METHODS: We proposed seven anatomical rating criteria including true and false positive structures, and we performed an expert rating study of over 1000 TGN visualizations, as follows. We tracked the TGN using high-quality dMRI data from 100 healthy adult subjects from the Human Connectome Project (HCP). TGN tracking performance was compared across dMRI acquisitions with b = 1000 s/mm, b = 2000 s/mm and b = 3000 s/mm, using single-tensor (1T) and two-tensor (2T) unscented Kalman filter (UKF) tractography. This resulted in a total of six tracking strategies. The TGN was identified using an anatomical region-of-interest (ROI) selection approach. First, in a subset of the dataset we identified ROIs that provided good TGN tracking performance across all tracking strategies. Using these ROIs, the TGN was then tracked in all subjects using the six tracking strategies. An expert rater (GX) visually assessed and scored each TGN based on seven anatomical judgment criteria. These criteria included the presence of multiple expected anatomical segments of the TGN (true positive structures), specifically branch-like structures, cisternal portion, mesencephalic trigeminal tract, and spinal cord tract of the TGN. False positive criteria included the presence of any fibers entering the temporal lobe, the inferior cerebellar peduncle, or the middle cerebellar peduncle. Expert rating scores were analyzed to compare TGN tracking performance across the six tracking strategies. Intra- and inter-rater validation was performed to assess the reliability of the expert TGN rating result. RESULTS: The TGN was selected using two anatomical ROIs (Meckel's Cave and cisternal portion of the TGN). The two-tensor tractography method had significantly better performance on identifying true positive structures, while generating more false positive streamlines in comparison to the single-tensor tractography method. TGN tracking performance was significantly different across the three b-values for almost all structures studied. Tracking performance was reported in terms of the percentage of subjects achieving each anatomical rating criterion. Tracking of the cisternal portion and branching structure of the TGN was generally successful, with the highest performance of over 98% using two-tensor tractography and b = 1000 or b = 2000. However, tracking the smaller mesencephalic and spinal cord tracts of the TGN was quite challenging (highest performance of 37.5% and 57.07%, using two-tensor tractography with b = 1000 and b = 2000, respectively). False positive connections to the temporal lobe (over 38% of subjects for all strategies) and cerebellar peduncles (100% of subjects for all strategies) were prevalent. High joint probability of agreement was obtained in the inter-rater (on average 83%) and intra-rater validation (on average 90%), showing a highly reliable expert rating result. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the results of the study suggest that researchers and clinicians may benefit from tailoring their acquisition and tracking methodology to the specific anatomical portion of the TGN that is of the greatest interest. For example, tracking of branching structures and TGN-T2 overlap can be best achieved with a two-tensor model and an acquisition using b = 1000 or b = 2000. In general, b = 1000 and b = 2000 acquisitions provided the best-rated tracking results. Further research is needed to improve both sensitivity and specificity of the depiction of the TGN anatomy using dMRI.
Lorenz Epprecht, Ahad Qureshi, Elliott D Kozin, Nicolas Vachicouras, Alexander M Huber, Ron Kikinis, Nikos Makris, Christian M Brown, Katherine L Reinshagen, and Daniel J Lee. 1/2020. “Human Cochlear Nucleus on 7 Tesla Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Insights Into Micro-anatomy and Function for Auditory Brainstem Implant Surgery.” Otol Neurotol.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The cochlear nucleus (CN) is the target of the auditory brainstem implant (ABI). Most ABI candidates have Neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) and distorted brainstem anatomy from bilateral vestibular schwannomas. The CN is difficult to characterize as routine structural MRI does not resolve detailed anatomy. We hypothesize that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enables both in vivo localization and quantitative measurements of CN morphology. STUDY DESIGN: We analyzed 7 Tesla (T) DTI images of 100 subjects (200 CN) and relevant anatomic structures using an MRI brainstem atlas with submillimetric (50 μm) resolution. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Young healthy normal hearing adults. INTERVENTION: Diagnostic. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Diffusion scalar measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), mode of anisotropy (Mode), principal eigenvectors of the CN, and the adjacent inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP). RESULTS: The CN had a lamellar structure and ventral-dorsal fiber orientation and could be localized lateral to the inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP). This fiber orientation was orthogonal to tracts of the adjacent ICP where the fibers run mainly caudal-rostrally. The CN had lower FA compared to the medial aspect of the ICP (0.44 ± 0.09 vs. 0.64 ± 0.08, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: 7T DTI enables characterization of human CN morphology and neuronal substructure. An ABI array insertion vector directed more caudally would better correspond to the main fiber axis of CN. State-of-the-art DTI has implications for ABI preoperative planning and future image guidance-assisted placement of the electrode array.
James J Levitt, Paul G Nestor, Marek Kubicki, Amanda E Lyall, Fan Zhang, Tammy Riklin-Raviv, Lauren J O Donnell, Robert W McCarley, Martha E Shenton, and Yogesh Rathi. 1/2020. “Miswiring of Frontostriatal Projections in Schizophrenia.” Schizophr Bull.Abstract
We investigated brain wiring in chronic schizophrenia and healthy controls in frontostriatal circuits using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging tractography in a novel way. We extracted diffusion streamlines in 27 chronic schizophrenia and 26 healthy controls connecting 4 frontal subregions to the striatum. We labeled the projection zone striatal surface voxels into 2 subtypes: dominant-input from a single cortical subregion, and, functionally integrative, with mixed-input from diverse cortical subregions. We showed: 1) a group difference for total striatal surface voxel number (P = .045) driven by fewer mixed-input voxels in the left (P  = .007), but not right, hemisphere; 2) a group by hemisphere interaction for the ratio quotient between voxel subtypes (P  = .04) with a left (P  = .006), but not right, hemisphere increase in schizophrenia, also reflecting fewer mixed-input voxels; and 3) fewer mixed-input voxel counts in schizophrenia (P  = .045) driven by differences in left hemisphere limbic (P  = .007) and associative (P  = .01), but not sensorimotor, striatum. These results demonstrate a less integrative pattern of frontostriatal structural connectivity in chronic schizophrenia. A diminished integrative pattern yields a less complex input pattern to the striatum from the cortex with less circuit integration at the level of the striatum. Further, as brain wiring occurs during early development, aberrant brain wiring could serve as a developmental biomarker for schizophrenia.
Laurent Chauvin, Kuldeep Kumar, Christian Wachinger, Marc Vangel, Jacques de Guise, Christian Desrosiers, William Wells, and Matthew Toews. 1/2020. “Neuroimage Signature from Salient Keypoints is Highly Specific to Individuals and Shared by Close Relatives.” Neuroimage, 204, Pp. 116208.Abstract
Neuroimaging studies typically adopt a common feature space for all data, which may obscure aspects of neuroanatomy only observable in subsets of a population, e.g. cortical folding patterns unique to individuals or shared by close relatives. Here, we propose to model individual variability using a distinctive keypoint signature: a set of unique, localized patterns, detected automatically in each image by a generic saliency operator. The similarity of an image pair is then quantified by the proportion of keypoints they share using a novel Jaccard-like measure of set overlap. Experiments demonstrate the keypoint method to be highly efficient and accurate, using a set of 7536 T1-weighted MRIs pooled from four public neuroimaging repositories, including twins, non-twin siblings, and 3334 unique subjects. All same-subject image pairs are identified by a similarity threshold despite confounds including aging and neurodegenerative disease progression. Outliers reveal previously unknown data labeling inconsistencies, demonstrating the usefulness of the keypoint signature as a computational tool for curating large neuroimage datasets.
2019
Fabio Nery, Filip Szczepankiewicz, Leevi Kerkelä, Matt G Hall, Enrico Kaden, Isky Gordon, David L Thomas, and Chris A Clark. 12/2019. “In vivo Demonstration of Microscopic Anisotropy in the Human Kidney using Multidimensional Diffusion MRI.” Magn Reson Med, 82, 6, Pp. 2160-8.Abstract
PURPOSE: To demonstrate the feasibility of multidimensional diffusion MRI to probe and quantify microscopic fractional anisotropy (µFA) in human kidneys in vivo. METHODS: Linear tensor encoded (LTE) and spherical tensor encoded (STE) renal diffusion MRI scans were performed in 10 healthy volunteers. Respiratory triggering and image registration were used to minimize motion artefacts during the acquisition. Kidney cortex-medulla were semi-automatically segmented based on fractional anisotropy (FA) values. A model-free analysis of LTE and STE signal dependence on b-value in the renal cortex and medulla was performed. Subsequently, µFA was estimated using a single-shell approach. Finally, a comparison of conventional FA and µFA is shown. RESULTS: The hallmark effect of µFA (divergence of LTE and STE signal with increasing b-value) was observed in all subjects. A statistically significant difference between LTE and STE signal was found in the cortex and medulla, starting from b = 750 s/mm and b = 500 s/mm , respectively. This difference was maximal at the highest b-value sampled (b = 1000 s/mm ) which suggests that relatively high b-values are required for µFA mapping in the kidney compared to conventional FA. Cortical and medullary µFA were, respectively, 0.53 ± 0.09 and 0.65 ± 0.05, both respectively higher than conventional FA (0.19 ± 0.02 and 0.40 ± 0.02). CONCLUSION: The feasibility of combining LTE and STE diffusion MRI to probe and quantify µFA in human kidneys is demonstrated for the first time. By doing so, we show that novel microstructure information-not accessible by conventional diffusion encoding-can be probed by multidimensional diffusion MRI. We also identify relevant technical limitations that warrant further development of the technique for body MRI.
Jian Wang, William M Wells, Polina Golland, and Miaomiao Zhang. 12/2019. “Registration Uncertainty Quantification via Low-dimensional Characterization of Geometric Deformations.” Magn Reson Imaging, 64, Pp. 122-31.Abstract
This paper presents an efficient approach to quantifying image registration uncertainty based on a low-dimensional representation of geometric deformations. In contrast to previous methods, we develop a Bayesian diffeomorphic registration framework in a bandlimited space, rather than a high-dimensional image space. We show that a dense posterior distribution on deformation fields can be fully characterized by much fewer parameters, which dramatically reduces the computational complexity of model inferences. To further avoid heavy computation loads introduced by random sampling algorithms, we approximate a marginal posterior by using Laplace's method at the optimal solution of log-posterior distribution. Experimental results on both 2D synthetic data and real 3D brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans demonstrate that our method is significantly faster than the state-of-the-art diffeomorphic registration uncertainty quantification algorithms, while producing comparable results.
Jie Luo, Alireza Sedghi, Karteek Popuri, Dana Cobzas, Miaomiao Zhang, Frank Preiswerk, Matthew Toews, Alexandra Golby, Masashi Sugiyama, William III M Wells, and Sarah Frisken. 10/2019. “On the Applicability of Registration Uncertainty.” In MICCAI 2019, LNCS 11765: Pp. 410-9. Shenzhen, China: Springer.Abstract
Estimating the uncertainty in (probabilistic) image registration enables, e.g., surgeons to assess the operative risk based on the trustworthiness of the registered image data. If surgeons receive inaccurately calculated registration uncertainty and misplace unwarranted confidence in the alignment solutions, severe consequences may result. For probabilistic image registration (PIR), the predominant way to quantify the registration uncertainty is using summary statistics of the distribution of transformation parameters. The majority of existing research focuses on trying out different summary statistics as well as means to exploit them. Distinctively, in this paper, we study two rarely examined topics: (1) whether those summary statistics of the transformation distribution most informatively represent the registration uncertainty; (2) Does utilizing the registration uncertainty always be beneficial. We show that there are two types of uncertainties: the transformation uncertainty, Ut, and label uncertainty Ul. The conventional way of using Ut to quantify Ul is inappropriate and can be misleading. By a real data experiment, we also share a potentially critical finding that making use of the registration uncertainty may not always be an improvement.
Luo MICCAI 2019
Karol Miller, Grand R Joldes, George Bourantas, Simon K Warfield, Damon E Hyde, Ron Kikinis, and Adam Wittek. 10/2019. “Biomechanical Modeling and Computer Simulation of the Brain during Neurosurgery.” Int J Numer Method Biomed Eng, 35, 10, Pp. e3250.Abstract
Computational biomechanics of the brain for neurosurgery is an emerging area of research recently gaining in importance and practical applications. This review paper presents the contributions of the Intelligent Systems for Medicine Laboratory and its collaborators to this field, discussing the modeling approaches adopted and the methods developed for obtaining the numerical solutions. We adopt a physics-based modeling approach and describe the brain deformation in mechanical terms (such as displacements, strains, and stresses), which can be computed using a biomechanical model, by solving a continuum mechanics problem. We present our modeling approaches related to geometry creation, boundary conditions, loading, and material properties. From the point of view of solution methods, we advocate the use of fully nonlinear modeling approaches, capable of capturing very large deformations and nonlinear material behavior. We discuss finite element and meshless domain discretization, the use of the total Lagrangian formulation of continuum mechanics, and explicit time integration for solving both time-accurate and steady-state problems. We present the methods developed for handling contacts and for warping 3D medical images using the results of our simulations. We present two examples to showcase these methods: brain shift estimation for image registration and brain deformation computation for neuronavigation in epilepsy treatment.
Filip Szczepankiewicz, Carl-Fredrik Westin, and Markus Nilsson. 10/2019. “Maxwell-compensated Design of Asymmetric Gradient Waveforms for Tensor-valued Diffusion Encoding.” Magn Reson Med, 82, 4, Pp. 1424-37.Abstract
PURPOSE: Diffusion encoding with asymmetric gradient waveforms is appealing because the asymmetry provides superior efficiency. However, concomitant gradients may cause a residual gradient moment at the end of the waveform, which can cause significant signal error and image artifacts. The purpose of this study was to develop an asymmetric waveform designs for tensor-valued diffusion encoding that is not sensitive to concomitant gradients. METHODS: The "Maxwell index" was proposed as a scalar invariant to capture the effect of concomitant gradients. Optimization of "Maxwell-compensated" waveforms was performed in which this index was constrained. Resulting waveforms were compared to waveforms from literature, in terms of the measured and predicted impact of concomitant gradients, by numerical analysis as well as experiments in a phantom and in a healthy human brain. RESULTS: Maxwell-compensated waveforms with Maxwell indices below 100 (mT/m) ms showed negligible signal bias in both numerical analysis and experiments. By contrast, several waveforms from literature showed gross signal bias under the same conditions, leading to a signal bias that was large enough to markedly affect parameter maps. Experimental results were accurately predicted by theory. CONCLUSION: Constraining the Maxwell index in the optimization of asymmetric gradient waveforms yields efficient diffusion encoding that negates the effects of concomitant fields while enabling arbitrary shapes of the b-tensor. This waveform design is especially useful in combination with strong gradients, long encoding times, thick slices, simultaneous multi-slice acquisition, and large FOVs.
Hamza Farooq, Yongxin Chen, Tryphon T Georgiou, Allen Tannenbaum, and Christophe Lenglet. 10/2019. “Network Curvature as a Hallmark of Brain Structural Connectivity.” Nat Commun, 10, 1, Pp. 4937.Abstract
Although brain functionality is often remarkably robust to lesions and other insults, it may be fragile when these take place in specific locations. Previous attempts to quantify robustness and fragility sought to understand how the functional connectivity of brain networks is affected by structural changes, using either model-based predictions or empirical studies of the effects of lesions. We advance a geometric viewpoint relying on a notion of network curvature, the so-called Ollivier-Ricci curvature. This approach has been proposed to assess financial market robustness and to differentiate biological networks of cancer cells from healthy ones. Here, we apply curvature-based measures to brain structural networks to identify robust and fragile brain regions in healthy subjects. We show that curvature can also be used to track changes in brain connectivity related to age and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and we obtain results that are in agreement with previous MRI studies.
Esra Abaci Turk, Jeffrey N Stout, Christopher Ha, Jie Luo, Borjan Gagoski, Filiz Yetisir, Polina Golland, Lawrence L Wald, Elfar Adalsteinsson, Julian N Robinson, Drucilla J Roberts, William H Barth, and Ellen P Grant. 10/2019. “Placental MRI: Developing Accurate Quantitative Measures of Oxygenation.” Top Magn Reson Imaging, 28, 5, Pp. 285-97.Abstract
The Human Placenta Project has focused attention on the need for noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based techniques to diagnose and monitor placental function throughout pregnancy. The hope is that the management of placenta-related pathologies would be improved if physicians had more direct, real-time measures of placental health to guide clinical decision making. As oxygen alters signal intensity on MRI and oxygen transport is a key function of the placenta, many of the MRI methods under development are focused on quantifying oxygen transport or oxygen content of the placenta. For example, measurements from blood oxygen level-dependent imaging of the placenta during maternal hyperoxia correspond to outcomes in twin pregnancies, suggesting that some aspects of placental oxygen transport can be monitored by MRI. Additional methods are being developed to accurately quantify baseline placental oxygenation by MRI relaxometry. However, direct validation of placental MRI methods is challenging and therefore animal studies and ex vivo studies of human placentas are needed. Here we provide an overview of the current state of the art of oxygen transport and quantification with MRI. We suggest that as these techniques are being developed, increased focus be placed on ensuring they are robust and reliable across individuals and standardized to enable predictive diagnostic models to be generated from the data. The field is still several years away from establishing the clinical benefit of monitoring placental function in real time with MRI, but the promise of individual personalized diagnosis and monitoring of placental disease in real time continues to motivate this effort.

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