Publications

2017
Joseph J Shaffer, Ali Ghayoor, Jeffrey D Long, Regina Eun-Young Kim, Spencer Lourens, Lauren J O'Donnell, Carl-Fredrik Westin, Yogesh Rathi, Vincent Magnotta, Jane S Paulsen, and Hans J Johnson. 3/2017. “Longitudinal Diffusion Changes in Prodromal and Early HD: Evidence of White-matter Tract Deterioration.” Hum Brain Mapp, 38, 3, Pp. 1460-77.Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects striatal neurons. Striatal volume loss is present years before clinical diagnosis; however, white matter degradation may also occur prior to diagnosis. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can measure microstructural changes associated with degeneration that precede macrostructural changes. DWI derived measures enhance understanding of degeneration in prodromal HD (pre-HD). METHODS: As part of the PREDICT-HD study, N = 191 pre-HD individuals and 70 healthy controls underwent two or more (baseline and 1-5 year follow-up) DWI, with n = 649 total sessions. Images were processed using cutting-edge DWI analysis methods for large multicenter studies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics were computed in selected tracts connecting the primary motor, primary somato-sensory, and premotor areas of the cortex with the subcortical caudate and putamen. Pre-HD participants were divided into three CAG-Age Product (CAP) score groups reflecting clinical diagnosis probability (low, medium, or high probabilities). Baseline and longitudinal group differences were examined using linear mixed models. RESULTS: Cross-sectional and longitudinal differences in DTI measures were present in all three CAP groups compared with controls. The high CAP group was most affected. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest longitudinal DWI study of pre-HD to date. Findings showed DTI differences, consistent with white matter degeneration, were present up to a decade before predicted HD diagnosis. Our findings indicate a unique role for disrupted connectivity between the premotor area and the putamen, which may be closely tied to the onset of motor symptoms in HD. 

Michael Halle, Valentin Demeusy, and Ron Kikinis. 3/2017. “The Open Anatomy Browser: A Collaborative Web-Based Viewer for Interoperable Anatomy Atlases.” Front Neuroinform, 11, Pp. 22.Abstract

The Open Anatomy Browser (OABrowser) is an open source, web-based, zero-installation anatomy atlas viewer based on current web browser technologies and evolving anatomy atlas interoperability standards. OABrowser displays three-dimensional anatomical models, image cross-sections of labeled structures and source radiological imaging, and a text-based hierarchy of structures. The viewer includes novel collaborative tools: users can save bookmarks of atlas views for later access and exchange those bookmarks with other users, and dynamic shared views allow groups of users can participate in a collaborative interactive atlas viewing session. We have published several anatomy atlases (an MRI-derived brain atlas and atlases of other parts of the anatomy) to demonstrate OABrowser's functionality. The atlas source data, processing tools, and the source for OABrowser are freely available through GitHub and are distributed under a liberal open source license.

Mukund Balasubramanian, William M Wells, John R Ives, Patrick Britz, Robert V. Mulkern, and Darren B Orbach. 3/2017. “RF Heating of Gold Cup and Conductive Plastic Electrodes during Simultaneous EEG and MRI.” Neurodiagn J, 57, 1, Pp. 69-83.Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate the heating of EEG electrodes during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms with a focus on the antenna effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Gold cup and conductive plastic electrodes were placed on small watermelons with fiberoptic probes used to measure electrode temperature changes during a variety of 1.5T and 3T MRI scans. A subset of these experiments was repeated on a healthy human volunteer. RESULTS: The differences between gold and plastic electrodes did not appear to be practically significant. For both electrode types, we observed heating below 4°C for straight wires whose lengths were multiples of ½ the radiofrequency (RF) wavelength and stronger heating (over 15°C) for wire lengths that were odd multiples of ¼ RF wavelength, consistent with the antenna effect. CONCLUSIONS: The antenna effect, which has received little attention so far in the context of EEG-MRI safety, can play as significant a role as the loop effect (from electromagnetic induction) in the heating of EEG electrodes, and therefore wire lengths that are odd multiples of ¼ RF wavelength should be avoided. These results have important implications for the design of EEG electrodes and MRI studies as they help to minimize the risk to patients undergoing MRI with EEG electrodes in place.
Lipeng Ning, Evren Özarslan, Carl-Fredrik Westin, and Yogesh Rathi. 2/1/2017. “Precise Inference and Characterization of Structural Organization (PICASO) of Tissue from Molecular Diffusion.” Neuroimage, 146, Pp. 452-73.Abstract

Inferring the microstructure of complex media from the diffusive motion of molecules is a challenging problem in diffusion physics. In this paper, we introduce a novel representation of diffusion MRI (dMRI) signal from tissue with spatially-varying diffusivity using a diffusion disturbance function. This disturbance function contains information about the (intra-voxel) spatial fluctuations in diffusivity due to restrictions, hindrances and tissue heterogeneity of the underlying tissue substrate. We derive the short- and long-range disturbance coefficients from this disturbance function to characterize the tissue structure and organization. Moreover, we provide an exact relation between the disturbance coefficients and the time-varying moments of the diffusion propagator, as well as their relation to specific tissue microstructural information such as the intra-axonal volume fraction and the apparent axon radius. The proposed approach is quite general and can model dMRI signal for any type of gradient sequence (rectangular, oscillating, etc.) without using the Gaussian phase approximation. The relevance of the proposed PICASO model is explored using Monte-Carlo simulations and in-vivo dMRI data. The results show that the estimated disturbance coefficients can distinguish different types of microstructural organization of axons.

Yukiko Saito, Marek Kubicki, Inga Katharina Koerte, Tatsui Otsuka, Yogesh Rathi, Ofer Pasternak, Sylvain Bouix, Ryan Eckbo, Zora Kikinis, Christian von Hohenberg, Tomohide Roppongi, Elisabetta Del Re, Takeshi Asami, Sang-Hyuk Lee, Sarina Karmacharya, Raquelle I Mesholam-Gately, Larry J Seidman, James J Levitt, Robert W McCarley, Martha E Shenton, and Margaret Niznikiewicz. 2/2017. “Impaired White Matter Connectivity between Regions Containing Mirror Neurons, and Relationship to Negative Symptoms and Social Cognition, in Patients with First-Episode Schizophrenia.” Brain Imaging Behav.Abstract
In schizophrenia, abnormalities in structural connectivity between brain regions known to contain mirror neurons and their relationship to negative symptoms related to a domain of social cognition are not well understood. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans were acquired in 16 patients with first episode schizophrenia and 16 matched healthy controls. FA and Trace of the tracts interconnecting regions known to be rich in mirror neurons, i.e., anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior parietal lobe (IPL) and premotor cortex (PMC) were evaluated. A significant group effect for Trace was observed in IPL-PMC white matter fiber tract (F (1, 28) = 7.13, p = .012), as well as in the PMC-ACC white matter fiber tract (F (1, 28) = 4.64, p = .040). There were no group differences in FA. In addition, patients with schizophrenia showed a significant positive correlation between the Trace of the left IPL-PMC white matter fiber tract, and the Ability to Feel Intimacy and Closeness score (rho = .57, p = 0.034), and a negative correlation between the Trace of the left PMC-ACC and the Relationships with Friends and Peers score (rho = remove -.54, p = 0.049). We have demonstrated disrupted white mater microstructure within the white matter tracts subserving brain regions containing mirror neurons. We further showed that such structural disruptions might impact negative symptoms and, more specifically, contribute to the inability to feel intimacy (a measure conceptually related to theory of mind) in first episode schizophrenia. Further studies are needed to understand the potential of our results for diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic interventions.
Marc Herrlich, Parnian Tavakol, David Black, Dirk Wenig, Christian Rieder, Rainer Malaka, and Ron Kikinis. 2/2017. “Instrument-mounted Displays for Reducing Cognitive Load during Surgical Navigation.” Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg, 12, 9, Pp. 1599-1605.Abstract
PURPOSE: Surgical navigation systems rely on a monitor placed in the operating room to relay information. Optimal monitor placement can be challenging in crowded rooms, and it is often not possible to place the monitor directly beside the situs. The operator must split attention between the navigation system and the situs. We present an approach for needle-based interventions to provide navigational feedback directly on the instrument and close to the situs by mounting a small display onto the needle. METHODS: By mounting a small and lightweight smartwatch display directly onto the instrument, we are able to provide navigational guidance close to the situs and directly in the operator's field of view, thereby reducing the need to switch the focus of view between the situs and the navigation system. We devise a specific variant of the established crosshair metaphor suitable for the very limited screen space. We conduct an empirical user study comparing our approach to using a monitor and a combination of both. RESULTS: Results from the empirical user study show significant benefits for cognitive load, user preference, and general usability for the instrument-mounted display, while achieving the same level of performance in terms of time and accuracy compared to using a monitor. CONCLUSION: We successfully demonstrate the feasibility of our approach and potential benefits. With ongoing technological advancements, instrument-mounted displays might complement standard monitor setups for surgical navigation in order to lower cognitive demands and for improved usability of such systems.
Rahul Sastry, Wenya Linda Bi, Steve Pieper, Sarah Frisken, Tina Kapur, William M Wells III, and Alexandra J Golby. 1/2017. “Applications of Ultrasound in the Resection of Brain Tumors.” J Neuroimaging, 27, 1, Pp. 5-15.Abstract

Neurosurgery makes use of preoperative imaging to visualize pathology, inform surgical planning, and evaluate the safety of selected approaches. The utility of preoperative imaging for neuronavigation, however, is diminished by the well-characterized phenomenon of brain shift, in which the brain deforms intraoperatively as a result of craniotomy, swelling, gravity, tumor resection, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, and many other factors. As such, there is a need for updated intraoperative information that accurately reflects intraoperative conditions. Since 1982, intraoperative ultrasound has allowed neurosurgeons to craft and update operative plans without ionizing radiation exposure or major workflow interruption. Continued evolution of ultrasound technology since its introduction has resulted in superior imaging quality, smaller probes, and more seamless integration with neuronavigation systems. Furthermore, the introduction of related imaging modalities, such as 3-dimensional ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, high-frequency ultrasound, and ultrasound elastography, has dramatically expanded the options available to the neurosurgeon intraoperatively. In the context of these advances, we review the current state, potential, and challenges of intraoperative ultrasound for brain tumor resection. We begin by evaluating these ultrasound technologies and their relative advantages and disadvantages. We then review three specific applications of these ultrasound technologies to brain tumor resection: (1) intraoperative navigation, (2) assessment of extent of resection, and (3) brain shift monitoring and compensation. We conclude by identifying opportunities for future directions in the development of ultrasound technologies.

Toshiyuki Ohtani, Paul G Nestor, Sylvain Bouix, Dominick Newell, Eric D Melonakos, Robert W McCarley, Martha E Shenton, and Marek Kubicki. 1/2017. “Exploring the Neural Substrates of Attentional Control and Human Intelligence: Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Prefrontal White Matter Tractography in Healthy Cognition.” Neuroscience, 341, Pp. 52-60.Abstract
We combined diffusion tension imaging (DTI) of prefrontal white matter integrity and neuropsychological measures to examine the functional neuroanatomy of human intelligence. Healthy participants completed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) along with neuropsychological tests of attention and executive control, as measured by Trail Making Test (TMT) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Stochastic tractography, considered the most effective DTI method, quantified white matter integrity of the medial orbital frontal cortex (mOFC) and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) circuitry. Based on prior studies, we hypothesized that posterior mOFC-rACC connections may play a key structural role linking attentional control processes and intelligence. Behavioral results provided strong support for this hypothesis, specifically linking attentional control processes, measured by Trails B and WCST perseverative errors, to intelligent quotient (IQ). Hierarchical regression results indicated left posterior mOFC-rACC fractional anisotropy (FA) and Trails B performance time, but not WCST perseverative errors, each contributed significantly to IQ, accounting for approximately 33.95-51.60% of the variance in IQ scores. These findings suggested that left posterior mOFC-rACC white matter connections may play a key role in supporting the relationship of executive functions of attentional control and general intelligence in healthy cognition.
Angela Albi, Ofer Pasternak, Ludovico Minati, Moira Marizzoni, David Bartrés-Faz, Núria Bargalló, Beatriz Bosch, Paolo Maria Rossini, Camillo Marra, Bernhard Müller, Ute Fiedler, Jens Wiltfang, Luca Roccatagliata, Agnese Picco, Flavio Mariano Nobili, Oliver Blin, Julien Sein, Jean-Philippe Ranjeva, Mira Didic, Stephanie Bombois, Renaud Lopes, Régis Bordet, Hélène Gros-Dagnac, Pierre Payoux, Giada Zoccatelli, Franco Alessandrini, Alberto Beltramello, Antonio Ferretti, Massimo Caulo, Marco Aiello, Carlo Cavaliere, Andrea Soricelli, Lucilla Parnetti, Roberto Tarducci, Piero Floridi, Magda Tsolaki, Manos Constantinidis, Antonios Drevelegas, Giovanni Frisoni, Jorge Jovicich, and Consortium PharmaCog. 1/2017. “Free Water Elimination Improves Test-Retest Reproducibility of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Indices in the Brain: A Longitudinal Multisite Study of Healthy Elderly Subjects.” Hum Brain Mapp, 38, 1, Pp. 12-26.Abstract

Free water elimination (FWE) in brain diffusion MRI has been shown to improve tissue specificity in human white matter characterization both in health and in disease. Relative to the classical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) model, FWE is also expected to increase sensitivity to microstructural changes in longitudinal studies. However, it is not clear if these two models differ in their test-retest reproducibility. This study compares a bi-tensor model for FWE with DTI by extending a previous longitudinal-reproducibility 3T multisite study (10 sites, 7 different scanner models) of 50 healthy elderly participants (55-80 years old) scanned in two sessions at least 1 week apart. We computed the reproducibility of commonly used DTI metrics (FA: fractional anisotropy, MD: mean diffusivity, RD: radial diffusivity, and AXD: axial diffusivity), derived either using a DTI model or a FWE model. The DTI metrics were evaluated over 48 white-matter regions of the JHU-ICBM-DTI-81 white-matter labels atlas, and reproducibility errors were assessed. We found that relative to the DTI model, FWE significantly reduced reproducibility errors in most areas tested. In particular, for the FA and MD metrics, there was an average reduction of approximately 1% in the reproducibility error. The reproducibility scores did not significantly differ across sites. This study shows that FWE improves sensitivity and is thus promising for clinical applications, with the potential to identify more subtle changes. The increased reproducibility allows for smaller sample size or shorter trials in studies evaluating biomarkers of disease progression or treatment effects. Hum Brain Mapp 38:12-26, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Alison M Pouch, Ahmed H Aly, Andras Lasso, Alexander V Nguyen, Adam B Scanlan, Francis X McGowan, Gabor Fichtinger, Robert C Gorman, Joseph H Gorman, Paul A Yushkevich, and Matthew A Jolley. 1/2017. “Image Segmentation and Modeling of the Pediatric Tricuspid Valve in Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.” Funct Imaging Model Heart, 10263, Pp. 95-105.Abstract
Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a single-ventricle congenital heart disease that is fatal if left unpalliated. In HLHS patients, the tricuspid valve is the only functioning atrioventricular valve, and its competence is therefore critical. This work demonstrates the first automated strategy for segmentation, modeling, and morphometry of the tricuspid valve in transthoracic 3D echocardiographic (3DE) images of pediatric patients with HLHS. After initial landmark placement, the automated segmentation step uses multi-atlas label fusion and the modeling approach uses deformable modeling with medial axis representation to produce patient-specific models of the tricuspid valve that can be comprehensively and quantitatively assessed. In a group of 16 pediatric patients, valve segmentation and modeling attains an accuracy (mean boundary displacement) of 0.8 ± 0.2 mm relative to manual tracing and shows consistency in annular and leaflet measurements. In the future, such image-based tools have the potential to improve understanding and evaluation of tricuspid valve morphology in HLHS and guide strategies for patient care.
Michael Halle, Ion-Florin Talos, Marianna Jakab, Nikos Makris, Dominick Meier, Lawrence L Wald, Bruce Fischl, and Ron Kikinis. 1/2017. Multi-modality MRI-based Atlas of the Brain. Surgical Planning Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Publisher's VersionAbstract
The Neuroimage Analysis Center's Computational Clinical Anatomy Core and the Surgical Planning Laboratory at Brigham and Women's Hospital is pleased to make available a multi-modality MRI-based atlas of the brain. Data was acquired at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging (courtesy Dr. Lawrence Wald) on a Siemens 3T scanner, using a multi-array head coil, in a healthy, 42 year old male. The data set consists of : 1. a volumetric whole head MPRAGE series (voxel size 0.75 mm isotropic). 2. a volumetric whole head T2-weighted series (voxel size 0.75 mm isotropic). 3. a downsampled version of both acquisitions at 1mm isotropic resolution. 4. a per voxel labeling of the structures based on the 1mm volumes. 5. a color file mapping label values to RadLex-ontology derived names and colors suitable for display. 6. MRML files for displaying the volumes in 3D Slicer version 3.6 or greater, available for download. The atlas data is made available under terms of the 3D Slicer License section B.
The Slicer4 version also consists of 1. hypotalamic parcellation (courtesy Nikos Makris [Neuroimage. 2013]) 2. cerebellar parcellation (courtesy Nikos Makris [J Cogn Neurosci. 2003], [Neuroimage. 2005]) 3.head and neck muscles segmentation 4. anatomical model hierarchy 5. several pre-defined Scene Views (“anatomy teaching files”). All in a mrb (Medical Reality Bundle) archive file that contains the mrml scene file and all data for loading into Slicer 4 for displaying the volumes in 3D Slicer version 4.0 or greater, available for download.
This work is funded as part of the Neuroimaging Analysis Center, grant number P41 RR013218, by the NIH's National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) and grant number P41 EB015902, by the NIH's National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) and the Google Faculty Research Award.
Contributors: Ilwoo Lyu and Martin Styner: Sulcal Curves, Samira Farough: Ventricular System, Ibraheem Naeem and Maria Naeem: Head and Neck Muscles, George Papadimitriou: Cerebellar Parcellation, Madiha Tahir: White Matter.
This atlas maybe viewed with our Open Anatomy Browser.
2016
Yongxin Chen, Jung Hun Oh, Romeil Sandhu, Sangkyu Lee, Joseph O Deasy, and Allen Tannenbaum. 12/2016. “Transcriptional Responses to Ultraviolet and Ionizing Radiation: An Approach Based on Graph Curvature.” Proceedings (IEEE Int Conf Bioinformatics Biomed), 2016, Pp. 1302-6.Abstract

More than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy in their treatment process. However, our understanding of abnormal transcriptional responses to radiation remains poor. In this study, we employ an extended definition of Ollivier-Ricci curvature based on LI-Wasserstein distance to investigate genes and biological processes associated with ionizing radiation (IR) and ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure using a microarray dataset. Gene expression levels were modeled on a gene interaction topology downloaded from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD). This was performed for IR, UV, and mock datasets, separately. The difference curvature value between IR and mock graphs (also between UV and mock) for each gene was used as a metric to estimate the extent to which the gene responds to radiation. We found that in comparison of the top 200 genes identified from IR and UV graphs, about 20~30% genes were overlapping. Through gene ontology enrichment analysis, we found that the metabolic-related biological process was highly associated with both IR and UV radiation exposure.

Demian Wassermann, Nikos Makris, Yogesh Rathi, Martha Shenton, Ron Kikinis, Marek Kubicki, and Carl-Fredrik Westin. 12/2016. “The White Matter Query Language: A Novel Approach for Describing Human White Matter Anatomy.” Brain Struct Funct, 221, 9, Pp. 4705-4721.Abstract

We have developed a novel method to describe human white matter anatomy using an approach that is both intuitive and simple to use, and which automatically extracts white matter tracts from diffusion MRI volumes. Further, our method simplifies the quantification and statistical analysis of white matter tracts on large diffusion MRI databases. This work reflects the careful syntactical definition of major white matter fiber tracts in the human brain based on a neuroanatomist's expert knowledge. The framework is based on a novel query language with a near-to-English textual syntax. This query language makes it possible to construct a dictionary of anatomical definitions that describe white matter tracts. The definitions include adjacent gray and white matter regions, and rules for spatial relations. This novel method makes it possible to automatically label white matter anatomy across subjects. After describing this method, we provide an example of its implementation where we encode anatomical knowledge in human white matter for ten association and 15 projection tracts per hemisphere, along with seven commissural tracts. Importantly, this novel method is comparable in accuracy to manual labeling. Finally, we present results applying this method to create a white matter atlas from 77 healthy subjects, and we use this atlas in a small proof-of-concept study to detect changes in association tracts that characterize schizophrenia.

Lauren J O'Donnell, Yannick Suter, Laura Rigolo, Pegah Kahali, Fan Zhang, Isaiah Norton, Angela Albi, Olutayo Olubiyi, Antonio Meola, Walid I Essayed, Prashin Unadkat, Pelin Aksit Ciris, William M Wells III, Yogesh Rathi, Carl-Fredrik Westin, and Alexandra J Golby. 11/2016. “Automated White Matter Fiber Tract Identification in Patients with Brain Tumors.” Neuroimage Clin, 13, Pp. 138-53.Abstract

We propose a method for the automated identification of key white matter fiber tracts for neurosurgical planning, and we apply the method in a retrospective study of 18 consecutive neurosurgical patients with brain tumors. Our method is designed to be relatively robust to challenges in neurosurgical tractography, which include peritumoral edema, displacement, and mass effect caused by mass lesions. The proposed method has two parts. First, we learn a data-driven white matter parcellation or fiber cluster atlas using groupwise registration and spectral clustering of multi-fiber tractography from healthy controls. Key fiber tract clusters are identified in the atlas. Next, patient-specific fiber tracts are automatically identified using tractography-based registration to the atlas and spectral embedding of patient tractography. Results indicate good generalization of the data-driven atlas to patients: 80% of the 800 fiber clusters were identified in all 18 patients, and 94% of the 800 fiber clusters were found in 16 or more of the 18 patients. Automated subject-specific tract identification was evaluated by quantitative comparison to subject-specific motor and language functional MRI, focusing on the arcuate fasciculus (language) and corticospinal tracts (motor), which were identified in all patients. Results indicate good colocalization: 89 of 95, or 94%, of patient-specific language and motor activations were intersected by the corresponding identified tract. All patient-specific activations were within 3mm of the corresponding language or motor tract. Overall, our results indicate the potential of an automated method for identifying fiber tracts of interest for neurosurgical planning, even in patients with mass lesions.

Filip Szczepankiewicz, Danielle van Westen, Elisabet Englund, Carl-Fredrik Westin, Freddy Ståhlberg, Jimmy Lätt, Pia C Sundgren, and Markus Nilsson. 11/2016. “The Link between Diffusion MRI and Tumor Heterogeneity: Mapping Cell Eccentricity and Density by Diffusional Variance Decomposition (DIVIDE).” Neuroimage, 142, Pp. 522-32.Abstract

The structural heterogeneity of tumor tissue can be probed by diffusion MRI (dMRI) in terms of the variance of apparent diffusivities within a voxel. However, the link between the diffusional variance and the tissue heterogeneity is not well-established. To investigate this link we test the hypothesis that diffusional variance, caused by microscopic anisotropy and isotropic heterogeneity, is associated with variable cell eccentricity and cell density in brain tumors. We performed dMRI using a novel encoding scheme for diffusional variance decomposition (DIVIDE) in 7 meningiomas and 8 gliomas prior to surgery. The diffusional variance was quantified from dMRI in terms of the total mean kurtosis (MKT), and DIVIDE was used to decompose MKT into components caused by microscopic anisotropy (MKA) and isotropic heterogeneity (MKI). Diffusion anisotropy was evaluated in terms of the fractional anisotropy (FA) and microscopic fractional anisotropy (μFA). Quantitative microscopy was performed on the excised tumor tissue, where structural anisotropy and cell density were quantified by structure tensor analysis and cell nuclei segmentation, respectively. In order to validate the DIVIDE parameters they were correlated to the corresponding parameters derived from microscopy. We found an excellent agreement between the DIVIDE parameters and corresponding microscopy parameters; MKA correlated with cell eccentricity (r=0.95, p<10(-7)) and MKI with the cell density variance (r=0.83, p<10(-3)). The diffusion anisotropy correlated with structure tensor anisotropy on the voxel-scale (FA, r=0.80, p<10(-3)) and microscopic scale (μFA, r=0.93, p<10(-6)). A multiple regression analysis showed that the conventional MKT parameter reflects both variable cell eccentricity and cell density, and therefore lacks specificity in terms of microstructure characteristics. However, specificity was obtained by decomposing the two contributions; MKA was associated only to cell eccentricity, and MKI only to cell density variance. The variance in meningiomas was caused primarily by microscopic anisotropy (mean±s.d.) MKA=1.11±0.33 vs MKI=0.44±0.20 (p<10(-3)), whereas in the gliomas, it was mostly caused by isotropic heterogeneity MKI=0.57±0.30 vs MKA=0.26±0.11 (p<0.05). In conclusion, DIVIDE allows non-invasive mapping of parameters that reflect variable cell eccentricity and density. These results constitute convincing evidence that a link exists between specific aspects of tissue heterogeneity and parameters from dMRI. Decomposing effects of microscopic anisotropy and isotropic heterogeneity facilitates an improved interpretation of tumor heterogeneity as well as diffusion anisotropy on both the microscopic and macroscopic scale.

Chantal MW Tax, Tom Dela Haije, Andrea Fuster, Carl-Fredrik Westin, Max A Viergever, Luc Florack, and Alexander Leemans. 11/2016. “Sheet Probability Index (SPI): Characterizing the Geometrical Organization of the White Matter with Diffusion MRI.” Neuroimage, 142, Pp. 260-79.Abstract

The question whether our brain pathways adhere to a geometric grid structure has been a popular topic of debate in the diffusion imaging and neuroscience societies. Wedeen et al. (2012a, b) proposed that the brain's white matter is organized like parallel sheets of interwoven pathways. Catani et al. (2012) concluded that this grid pattern is most likely an artifact, resulting from methodological biases that cause the tractography pathways to cross in orthogonal angles. To date, ambiguities in the mathematical conditions for a sheet structure to exist (e.g. its relation to orthogonal angles) combined with the lack of extensive quantitative evidence have prevented wide acceptance of the hypothesis. In this work, we formalize the relevant terminology and recapitulate the condition for a sheet structure to exist. Note that this condition is not related to the presence or absence of orthogonal crossing fibers, and that sheet structure is defined formally as a surface formed by two sets of interwoven pathways intersecting at arbitrary angles within the surface. To quantify the existence of sheet structure, we present a novel framework to compute the sheet probability index (SPI), which reflects the presence of sheet structure in discrete orientation data (e.g. fiber peaks derived from diffusion MRI). With simulation experiments we investigate the effect of spatial resolution, curvature of the fiber pathways, and measurement noise on the ability to detect sheet structure. In real diffusion MRI data experiments we can identify various regions where the data supports sheet structure (high SPI values), but also areas where the data does not support sheet structure (low SPI values) or where no reliable conclusion can be drawn. Several areas with high SPI values were found to be consistent across subjects, across multiple data sets obtained with different scanners, resolutions, and degrees of diffusion weighting, and across various modeling techniques. Under the strong assumption that the diffusion MRI peaks reflect true axons, our results would therefore indicate that pathways do not form sheet structures at every crossing fiber region but instead at well-defined locations in the brain. With this framework, sheet structure location, extent, and orientation could potentially serve as new structural features of brain tissue. The proposed method can be extended to quantify sheet structure in directional data obtained with techniques other than diffusion MRI, which is essential for further validation.

Polina Binder, Kayhan N Batmanghelich, Raul San Jose Estepar, and Polina Golland. 10/2016. “Unsupervised Discovery of Emphysema Subtypes in a Large Clinical Cohort.” Int Conf Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. Workshop on Machine Learning in Medical Imaging. 19 (WS), Pp. 180-7.
Terry M Peters and Cristian A Linte. 10/2016. “Image-guided Interventions and Computer-integrated Therapy: Quo Vadis?” Med Image Anal, 33, Pp. 56-63.Abstract
Significant efforts have been dedicated to minimizing invasiveness associated with surgical interventions, most of which have been possible thanks to the developments in medical imaging, surgical navigation, visualization and display technologies. Image-guided interventions have promised to dramatically change the way therapies are delivered to many organs. However, in spite of the development of many sophisticated technologies over the past two decades, other than some isolated examples of successful implementations, minimally invasive therapy is far from enjoying the wide acceptance once envisioned. This paper provides a large-scale overview of the state-of-the-art developments, identifies several barriers thought to have hampered the wider adoption of image-guided navigation, and suggests areas of research that may potentially advance the field.
Tina Kapur, Steve Pieper, Andriy Fedorov, J-C Fillion-Robin, Michael Halle, Lauren O'Donnell, Andras Lasso, Tamas Ungi, Csaba Pinter, Julien Finet, Sonia Pujol, Jayender Jagadeesan, Junichi Tokuda, Isaiah Norton, Raul San Jose Estepar, David Gering, Hugo JWL Aerts, Marianna Jakab, Nobuhiko Hata, Luiz Ibanez, Daniel Blezek, Jim Miller, Stephen Aylward, Eric WL Grimson, Gabor Fichtinger, William M Wells III, William E Lorensen, Will Schroeder, and Ron Kikinis. 10/2016. “Increasing the Impact of Medical Image Computing using Community-based Open-access Hackathons: The NA-MIC and 3D Slicer Experience.” Med Image Anal, 33, Pp. 176-80.Abstract

The National Alliance for Medical Image Computing (NA-MIC) was launched in 2004 with the goal of investigating and developing an open source software infrastructure for the extraction of information and knowledge from medical images using computational methods. Several leading research and engineering groups participated in this effort that was funded by the US National Institutes of Health through a variety of infrastructure grants. This effort transformed 3D Slicer from an internal, Boston-based, academic research software application into a professionally maintained, robust, open source platform with an international leadership and developer and user communities. Critical improvements to the widely used underlying open source libraries and tools-VTK, ITK, CMake, CDash, DCMTK-were an additional consequence of this effort. This project has contributed to close to a thousand peer-reviewed publications and a growing portfolio of US and international funded efforts expanding the use of these tools in new medical computing applications every year. In this editorial, we discuss what we believe are gaps in the way medical image computing is pursued today; how a well-executed research platform can enable discovery, innovation and reproducible science ("Open Science"); and how our quest to build such a software platform has evolved into a productive and rewarding social engineering exercise in building an open-access community with a shared vision.

Miaomiao Zhang, William M Wells, and Polina Golland. 10/2016. “Low-Dimensional Statistics of Anatomical Variability via Compact Representation of Image Deformations.” Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv, 9902, Pp. 166-73.Abstract
Using image-based descriptors to investigate clinical hypotheses and therapeutic implications is challenging due to the notorious "curse of dimensionality" coupled with a small sample size. In this paper, we present a low-dimensional analysis of anatomical shape variability in the space of diffeomorphisms and demonstrate its benefits for clinical studies. To combat the high dimensionality of the deformation descriptors, we develop a probabilistic model of principal geodesic analysis in a bandlimited low-dimensional space that still captures the underlying variability of image data. We demonstrate the performance of our model on a set of 3D brain MRI scans from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. Our model yields a more compact representation of group variation at substantially lower computational cost than models based on the high-dimensional state-of-the-art approaches such as tangent space PCA (TPCA) and probabilistic principal geodesic analysis (PPGA).

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