Publications

2017
David Black, Christian Hansen, Arya Nabavi, Ron Kikinis, and Horst Hahn. 10/2017. “A Survey of Auditory Display in Image-guided Interventions.” Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg, 12, 10, Pp. 1665-76.Abstract
PURPOSE: This article investigates the current state of the art of the use of auditory display in image-guided medical interventions. Auditory display is a means of conveying information using sound, and we review the use of this approach to support navigated interventions. We discuss the benefits and drawbacks of published systems and outline directions for future investigation. METHODS: We undertook a review of scientific articles on the topic of auditory rendering in image-guided intervention. This includes methods for avoidance of risk structures and instrument placement and manipulation. The review did not include auditory display for status monitoring, for instance in anesthesia. RESULTS: We identified 15 publications in the course of the search. Most of the literature (60%) investigates the use of auditory display to convey distance of a tracked instrument to an object using proximity or safety margins. The remainder discuss continuous guidance for navigated instrument placement. Four of the articles present clinical evaluations, 11 present laboratory evaluations, and 3 present informal evaluation (2 present both laboratory and clinical evaluations). CONCLUSION: Auditory display is a growing field that has been largely neglected in research in image-guided intervention. Despite benefits of auditory displays reported in both the reviewed literature and non-medical fields, adoption in medicine has been slow. Future challenges include increasing interdisciplinary cooperation with auditory display investigators to develop more meaningful auditory display designs and comprehensive evaluations which target the benefits and drawbacks of auditory display in image guidance.
Marc Niethammer, Kilian M Pohl, Firdaus Janoos, and William M Wells. 9/2017. “Active Mean Fields for Probabilistic Image Segmentation: Connections with Chan-Vese and Rudin-Osher-Fatemi Models.” SIAM J. Imaging Sci., 10, 3, Pp. 1069-1103.Abstract
Segmentation is a fundamental task for extracting semantically meaningful regions from an image. The goal of segmentation algorithms is to accurately assign object labels to each image location. However, image noise, shortcomings of algorithms, and image ambiguities cause uncertainty in label assignment. Estimating this uncertainty is important in multiple application domains, such as segmenting tumors from medical images for radiation treatment planning. One way to estimate these uncertainties is through the computation of posteriors of Bayesian models, which is computationally prohibitive for many practical applications. However, most computationally efficient methods fail to estimate label uncertainty. We therefore propose in this paper the active mean fields (AMF) approach, a technique based on Bayesian modeling that uses a mean-field approximation to efficiently compute a segmentation and its corresponding uncertainty. Based on a variational formulation, the resulting convex model combines any label-likelihood measure with a prior on the length of the segmentation boundary. A specific implementation of that model is the Chan-Vese segmentation model, in which the binary segmentation task is defined by a Gaussian likelihood and a prior regularizing the length of the segmentation boundary. Furthermore, the Euler-Lagrange equations derived from the AMF model are equivalent to those of the popular Rudin-Osher-Fatemi (ROF) model for image denoising. Solutions to the AMF model can thus be implemented by directly utilizing highly efficient ROF solvers on log-likelihood ratio fields. We qualitatively assess the approach on synthetic data as well as on real natural and medical images. For a quantitative evaluation, we apply our approach to the tt icgbench dataset.
David Black, Julian Hettig, Maria Luz, Christian Hansen, Ron Kikinis, and Horst Hahn. 9/2017. “Auditory Feedback to Support Image-Guided Medical Needle Placement.” Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg, 12, 9, Pp. 1655-63.Abstract
PURPOSE: During medical needle placement using image-guided navigation systems, the clinician must concentrate on a screen. To reduce the clinician's visual reliance on the screen, this work proposes an auditory feedback method as a stand-alone method or to support visual feedback for placing the navigated medical instrument, in this case a needle. METHODS: An auditory synthesis model using pitch comparison and stereo panning parameter mapping was developed to augment or replace visual feedback for navigated needle placement. In contrast to existing approaches which augment but still require a visual display, this method allows view-free needle placement. An evaluation with 12 novice participants compared both auditory and combined audiovisual feedback against existing visual methods. RESULTS: Using combined audiovisual display, participants show similar task completion times and report similar subjective workload and accuracy while viewing the screen less compared to using the conventional visual method. The auditory feedback leads to higher task completion times and subjective workload compared to both combined and visual feedback. CONCLUSION: Audiovisual feedback shows promising results and establishes a basis for applying auditory feedback as a supplement to visual information to other navigated interventions, especially those for which viewing a patient is beneficial or necessary.
Ning Lipeng and Yogesh Rathi. 9/2017. “Dynamic Regression for Partial Correlation and Causality Analysis of Functional Brain Networks.” Int Conf Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 20 (Pt1), Pp. 365-72.Abstract
We propose a general dynamic regression framework for partial correlation and causality analysis of functional brain networks. Using the optimal prediction theory, we present the solution of the dynamic regression problem by minimizing the entropy of the associated stochastic process. We also provide the relation between the solutions and the linear dependence models of Geweke and Granger and derive novel expressions for computing partial correlation and causality using an optimal prediction filter with minimum error variance. We use the proposed dynamic framework to study the intrinsic partial correlation and causal- ity between seven different brain networks using resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) data from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) and compare our results with those obtained from standard correlation and causality measures. The results show that our optimal prediction filter explains a significant portion of the variance in the rsfMRI data at low frequencies, unlike standard partial correlation analysis.
Ning-MICCAI2017.pdf
Yi Hong, Polina Golland, and Miaomiao Zhang. 9/2017. “Fast Geodesic Regression for Population-Based Image Analysis.” Int Conf Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 20 (Pt1), Pp. 317-25.Abstract
Geodesic regression on images enables studies of brain development and degeneration, disease progression, and tumor growth. The high-dimensional nature of image data presents significant computational challenges for the current regression approaches and prohibits large scale studies. In this paper, we present a fast geodesic regression method that dramatically decreases the computational cost of the inference procedure while maintaining prediction accuracy. We employ an efficient low dimensional representation of diffeomorphic transformations derived from the image data and characterize the regressed trajectory in the space of diffeomorphisms by its initial conditions, i.e., an initial image template and an initial velocity field computed as a weighted average of pairwise diffeomorphic image registration results. This construction is achieved by using a first-order approximation of pairwise distances between images. We demonstrate the efficiency of our model on a set of 3D brain MRI scans from the OASIS dataset and show that it is dramatically faster than the state-of-the-art regression methods while producing equally good regression results on the large subject cohort.
Hong-MICCAI2017.pdf
Yongxin Chen, Tryphon T Georgiou, Lipeng Ning, and Allen Tannenbaum. 9/2017. “Matricial Wasserstein-1 Distance.” IEEE Control Syst Lett, 1, 1, Pp. 14-9.Abstract
We propose an extension of the Wasserstein 1-metric (W1) for density matrices, matrix-valued density measures, and an unbalanced interpretation of mass transport. We use duality theory and, in particular, a "dual of the dual" formulation of W1. This matrix analogue of the Earth Mover's Distance has several attractive features including ease of computation.
Yoshito Otake, Futishi Yokota, Norio Fukuda, Masaki Takao, Shu Takagi, Naoto Yamamura, Lauren O'Donnell, Westin Carl-Fredrik, Nobuhiko Sugano, and Yoshinobu Sato. 9/2017. “Patient-Specific Skeletal Muscle Fiber Modeling from Structure Tensor Field of Clinical CT Images.” Int Conf Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 20 (Pt1), Pp. 656-63.Abstract
We propose an optimization method for estimating patient- specific muscle fiber arrangement from clinical CT. Our approach first computes the structure tensor field to estimate local orientation, then a geometric template representing fiber arrangement is fitted using a B- spline deformation by maximizing fitness of the local orientation using a smoothness penalty. The initialization is computed with a previously proposed algorithm that takes account of only the muscle’s surface shape. Evaluation was performed using a CT volume (1.0mm3/voxel) and high resolution optical images of a serial cryosection (0.1mm3/voxel). The mean fiber distance error at the initialization of 6.00 mm was decreased to 2.78mm after the proposed optimization for the gluteus maximus muscle, and from 5.28 mm to 3.09 mm for the gluteus medius muscle. The result from 20 patient CT images suggested that the proposed algorithm reconstructed an anatomically more plausible fiber arrangement than the previous method.
Otake-MICCAI2017.pdf
Yongxin Chen, Tryphon Georgiou, Michele Pavon, and Allen Tannenbaum. 9/2017. “Robust Transport over Networks.” IEEE Trans Automat Contr, 62, 9, Pp. 4675-82.Abstract
We consider transportation over a strongly connected, directed graph. The scheduling amounts to selecting transition probabilities for a discrete-time Markov evolution which is designed to be consistent with initial and final marginal constraints on mass transport. We address the situation where initially the mass is concentrated on certain nodes and needs to be transported in a certain time period to another set of nodes, possibly disjoint from the first. The random evolution is selected to be closest to a prior measure on paths in the relative entropy sense-such a construction is known as a Schrödinger bridge between the two given marginals. It may be viewed as an atypical stochastic control problem where the control consists in suitably modifying the prior transition mechanism. The prior can be chosen to incorporate constraints and costs for traversing specific edges of the graph, but it can also be selected to allocate equal probability to all paths of equal length connecting any two nodes (i.e., a uniform distribution on paths). This latter choice for prior transitions relies on the so-called Ruelle-Bowen random walker and gives rise to scheduling that tends to utilize all paths as uniformly as the topology allows. Thus, this Ruelle-Bowen law (Ruelle-Bowen Law) taken as prior, leads to a transportation plan that tends to lessen congestion and ensures a level of robustness. We also show that the distribution Ruelle-Bowen Law on paths, which attains the maximum entropy rate for the random walker given by the topological entropy, can itself be obtained as the time-homogeneous solution of a maximum entropy problem for measures on paths (also a Schrödinger bridge problem, albeit with prior that is not a probability measure). Finally we show that the paradigm of Schrödinger bridges as a mechanism for scheduling transport on networks can be adapted to graphs that are not strongly connected, as well as to weighted graphs. In the latter case, our approach may be used to design a transportation plan which effectively compromises between robustness and other criteria such as cost. Indeed, we explicitly provide a robust transportation plan which assigns maximum probability to minimum cost paths and therefore compares favourably with Optimal Mass Transportation strategies.
Zhang Fan, Wu Weining, Ning Lipeng, McAnulty Gloria, Waber Deborah, Borjan Gagoski, Sarill Kiera, Hamoda Hesham M, Song Yang, Cai Weidong, Yogesh Rathi, and Lauren J O'Donnell. 9/2017. “Supra-Threshold Fiber Cluster Statistics for Data-Driven Whole Brain Tractography Analysis.” Int Conf Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 20 (Pt1), Pp. 556-65.Abstract
This work presents a supra-threshold fiber cluster (STFC) analysis that leverages the whole brain fiber geometry to enhance sta- tistical group difference analysis. The proposed method consists of (1) a study-specific data-driven tractography parcellation to obtain white matter (WM) tract parcels according to the WM anatomy and (2) a nonparametric permutation-based STFC test to identify significant dif- ferences between study populations (e.g. disease and healthy). The basic idea of our method is that a WM parcel’s neighborhood (parcels with similar WM anatomy) can support the parcel’s statistical significance when correcting for multiple comparisons. The method is demonstrated by application to a multi-shell diffusion MRI dataset from 59 individuals, including 30 attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients and 29 healthy controls (HCs). Evaluations are conducted using both synthetic and real data. The results indicate that our STFC method gives greater sensitivity in finding group differences in WM tract parcels compared to several traditional multiple comparison correction methods.
Zhang-MICCAI2017.pdf
Lena Maier-Hein, Swaroop Vedula, Stefanis Speidel, Nassir Navab, Ron Kikinis, Matthias Eisenman, Hubertus Feussner, and Germain Forestier. 9/2017. “Surgical Data Science for Next-generation Interventions.” Nature Biomedical Engineering, 1, Pp. 691-6.
Anne-Katrin Giese, Markus D Schirmer, Kathleen L Donahue, Lisa Cloonan, Robert Irie, Stefan Winzeck, Mark JRJ Bouts, Elissa C McIntosh, Steven J Mocking, Adrian V Dalca, Ramesh Sridharan, Huichun Xu, Petrea Frid, Eva Giralt-Steinhauer, Lukas Holmegaard, Jaume Roquer, Johan Wasselius, John W Cole, Patrick F McArdle, Joseph P Broderick, Jordi Jimenez-Conde, Christina Jern, Brett M Kissela, Dawn O Kleindorfer, Robin Lemmens, Arne Lindgren, James F Meschia, Tatjana Rundek, Ralph L Sacco, Reinhold Schmidt, Pankaj Sharma, Agnieszka Slowik, Vincent Thijs, Daniel Woo, Bradford B Worrall, Steven J Kittner, Braxton D Mitchell, Jonathan Rosand, Polina Golland, Ona Wu, and Natalia S Rost. 8/2017. “Design and Rationale for Examining Neuroimaging Genetics in Ischemic Stroke: The MRI-GENIE Study.” Neurol Genet, 3, 5, Pp. e180.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the design and rationale for the genetic analysis of acute and chronic cerebrovascular neuroimaging phenotypes detected on clinical MRI in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) within the scope of the MRI-GENetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) study. METHODS: MRI-GENIE capitalizes on the existing infrastructure of the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN). In total, 12 international SiGN sites contributed MRIs of 3,301 patients with AIS. Detailed clinical phenotyping with the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke (CCS) system and genome-wide genotyping data were available for all participants. Neuroimaging analyses include the manual and automated assessments of established MRI markers. A high-throughput MRI analysis pipeline for the automated assessment of cerebrovascular lesions on clinical scans will be developed in a subset of scans for both acute and chronic lesions, validated against gold standard, and applied to all available scans. The extracted neuroimaging phenotypes will improve characterization of acute and chronic cerebrovascular lesions in ischemic stroke, including CCS subtypes, and their effect on functional outcomes after stroke. Moreover, genetic testing will uncover variants associated with acute and chronic MRI manifestations of cerebrovascular disease. CONCLUSIONS: The MRI-GENIE study aims to develop, validate, and distribute the MRI analysis platform for scans acquired as part of clinical care for patients with AIS, which will lead to (1) novel genetic discoveries in ischemic stroke, (2) strategies for personalized stroke risk assessment, and (3) personalized stroke outcome assessment.
Karl-Heinz Nenning, Hesheng Liu, Satrajit S Ghosh, Mert R Sabuncu, Ernst Schwartz, and Georg Langs. 8/2017. “Diffeomorphic Functional Brain Surface Alignment: Functional Demons.” Neuroimage, 156, Pp. 456-65.Abstract
Aligning brain structures across individuals is a central prerequisite for comparative neuroimaging studies. Typically, registration approaches assume a strong association between the features used for alignment, such as macro-anatomy, and the variable observed, such as functional activation or connectivity. Here, we propose to use the structure of intrinsic resting state fMRI signal correlation patterns as a basis for alignment of the cortex in functional studies. Rather than assuming the spatial correspondence of functional structures between subjects, we have identified locations with similar connectivity profiles across subjects. We mapped functional connectivity relationships within the brain into an embedding space, and aligned the resulting maps of multiple subjects. We then performed a diffeomorphic alignment of the cortical surfaces, driven by the corresponding features in the joint embedding space. Results show that functional alignment based on resting state fMRI identifies functionally homologous regions across individuals with higher accuracy than alignment based on the spatial correspondence of anatomy. Further, functional alignment enables measurement of the strength of the anatomo-functional link across the cortex, and reveals the uneven distribution of this link. Stronger anatomo-functional dissociation was found in higher association areas compared to primary sensory- and motor areas. Functional alignment based on resting state features improves group analysis of task based functional MRI data, increasing statistical power and improving the delineation of task-specific core regions. Finally, a comparison of the anatomo-functional dissociation between cohorts is demonstrated with a group of left and right handed subjects.
Fang Ji, Ofer Pasternak, Siwei Liu, Yng Miin Loke, Boon Linn Choo, Saima Hilal, Xin Xu, Mohammad Kamran Ikram, Narayanaswamy Venketasubramanian, Christopher Li-Hsian Chen, and Juan Zhou. 8/2017. “Distinct White Matter Microstructural Abnormalities and Extracellular Water Increases Relate to Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease with And without Cerebrovascular Disease.” Alzheimers Res Ther, 9, 1, Pp. 63.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) with concomitant cerebrovascular disease, has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. The brain white matter (WM) microstructural changes in neurodegeneration well-documented by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can originate from brain tissue or extracellular free water changes. The differential microstructural and free water changes in AD with and without cerebrovascular disease, especially in normal-appearing WM, remain largely unknown. To cover these gaps, we aimed to characterize the WM free water and tissue microstructural changes in AD and mixed dementia as well as their associations with cognition using a novel free water imaging method. METHODS: We compared WM free water and free water-corrected DTI measures as well as white matter hyperintensity (WMH) in patients with AD with and without cerebrovascular disease, patients with vascular dementia, and age-matched healthy control subjects. RESULTS: The cerebrovascular disease groups had higher free water than the non-cerebrovascular disease groups. Importantly, besides the cerebrovascular disease groups, patients with AD without cerebrovascular disease also had increased free water in normal-appearing WM compared with healthy control subjects, reflecting mild vascular damage. Such free water increases in WM or normal-appearing WM (but not WMH) contributed to dementia severity. Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis revealed a close association between widespread free water increases and poorer attention, executive functioning, visual construction, and motor performance, whereas only left hemispheric free water increases were related to language deficits. Moreover, compared with the original DTI metrics, the free water-corrected DTI metric revealed tissue damage-specific (frontal and occipital) microstructural differences between the cerebrovascular disease and non-cerebrovascular disease groups. In contrast to both lobar and subcortical/brainstem free water increases, only focal lobar microstructural damage was associated with poorer cognitive performance. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that free water analysis isolates probable mild vascular damage from WM microstructural alterations and underscore the importance of normal-appearing WM changes underlying cognitive and functional impairment in AD with and without cerebrovascular disease. Further developed, the combined free water and tissue neuroimaging assays could help in differential diagnosis, treatment planning, and disease monitoring of patients with mixed dementia.
Lipeng Ning, Kawin Setsompop, Carl-Fredrik Westin, and Yogesh Rathi. 8/2017. “New Insights about Time-varying Diffusivity and its Estimation from Diffusion MRI.” Magn Reson Med, 78, 2, Pp. 763-74.Abstract

PURPOSE: Characterizing the relation between the applied gradient sequences and the measured diffusion MRI signal is important for estimating the time-dependent diffusivity, which provides important information about the microscopic tissue structure. THEORY AND METHODS: In this article, we extend the classical theory of Stepišnik for measuring time-dependent diffusivity under the Gaussian phase approximation. In particular, we derive three novel expressions which represent the diffusion MRI signal in terms of the mean-squared displacement, the instantaneous diffusivity, and the velocity autocorrelation function. We present the explicit signal expressions for the case of single diffusion encoding and oscillating gradient spin-echo sequences. Additionally, we also propose three different models to represent time-varying diffusivity and test them using Monte-Carlo simulations and in vivo human brain data. RESULTS: The time-varying diffusivities are able to distinguish the synthetic structures in the Monte-Carlo simulations. There is also strong statistical evidence about time-varying diffusivity from the in vivo human data set. CONCLUSION: The proposed theory provides new insights into our understanding of the time-varying diffusivity using different gradient sequences. The proposed models for representing time-varying diffusivity can be utilized to study time-varying diffusivity using in vivo human brain diffusion MRI data. 

Yongxin Chen, Filemon Dela Cruz, Romeil Sandhu, Andrew L Kung, Prabhjot Mundi, Joseph O Deasy, and Allen Tannenbaum. 8/2017. “Pediatric Sarcoma Data Forms a Unique Cluster Measured via the Earth Mover's Distance.” Sci Rep, 7, 1, Pp. 7035.Abstract
In this note, we combined pediatric sarcoma data from Columbia University with adult sarcoma data collected from TCGA, in order to see if one can automatically discern a unique pediatric cluster in the combined data set. Using a novel clustering pipeline based on optimal transport theory, this turned out to be the case. The overall methodology may find uses for the classification of data from other biological networking problems.
Roxana G Burciu, Edward Ofori, Derek B Archer, Samuel S Wu, Ofer Pasternak, Nikolaus R McFarland, Michael S Okun, and David E Vaillancourt. 8/2017. “Progression Marker of Parkinson's Disease: A 4-year Multi-site Imaging Study.” Brain, 140, 8, Pp. 2183-92.Abstract
Progression markers of Parkinson's disease are crucial for successful therapeutic development. Recently, a diffusion magnetic resonance imaging analysis technique using a bitensor model was introduced allowing the estimation of the fractional volume of free water within a voxel, which is expected to increase in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Prior work demonstrated that free water in the posterior substantia nigra was elevated in Parkinson's disease compared to controls across single- and multi-site cohorts, and increased over 1 year in Parkinson's disease but not in controls at a single site. Here, the goal was to validate free water in the posterior substantia nigra as a progression marker in Parkinson's disease, and describe the pattern of progression of free water in patients with a 4-year follow-up tested in a multicentre international longitudinal study of de novo Parkinson's disease (http://www.ppmi-info.org/). The analyses examined: (i) 1-year changes in free water in 103 de novo patients with Parkinson's disease and 49 controls; (ii) 2- and 4-year changes in free water in a subset of 46 patients with Parkinson's disease imaged at baseline, 12, 24, and 48 months; (iii) whether 1- and 2-year changes in free water predict 4-year changes in the Hoehn and Yahr scale; and (iv) the relationship between 4-year changes in free water and striatal binding ratio in a subgroup of Parkinson's disease who had undergone both diffusion and dopamine transporter imaging. Results demonstrated that: (i) free water level in the posterior substantia nigra increased over 1 year in de novo Parkinson's disease but not in controls; (ii) free water kept increasing over 4 years in Parkinson's disease; (iii) sex and baseline free water predicted 4-year changes in free water; (iv) free water increases over 1 and 2 years were related to worsening on the Hoehn and Yahr scale over 4 years; and (v) the 4-year increase in free water was associated with the 4-year decrease in striatal binding ratio in the putamen. Importantly, all longitudinal results were consistent across sites. In summary, this study demonstrates an increase over 1 year in free water in the posterior substantia nigra in a large cohort of de novo patients with Parkinson's disease from a multi-site cohort study and no change in healthy controls, and further demonstrates an increase of free water in Parkinson's disease over the course of 4 years. A key finding was that results are consistent across sites and the 1-year and 2-year increase in free water in the posterior substantia nigra predicts subsequent long-term progression on the Hoehn and Yahr staging system. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that free water in the posterior substantia nigra is a valid, progression imaging marker of Parkinson's disease, which may be used in clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies.
Anna S Rydhög, Filip Szczepankiewicz, Ronnie Wirestam, André Ahlgren, Carl-Fredrik Westin, Linda Knutsson, and Ofer Pasternak. 8/2017. “Separating Blood and Water: Perfusion and Free Water Elimination from Diffusion MRI in the Human Brain.” Neuroimage, 156, Pp. 423-34.Abstract
The assessment of the free water fraction in the brain provides important information about extracellular processes such as atrophy and neuroinflammation in various clinical conditions as well as in normal development and aging. Free water estimates from diffusion MRI are assumed to account for freely diffusing water molecules in the extracellular space, but may be biased by other pools of molecules in rapid random motion, such as the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) of blood, where water molecules perfuse in the randomly oriented capillary network. The goal of this work was to separate the signal contribution of the perfusing blood from that of free-water and of other brain diffusivities. The influence of the vascular compartment on the estimation of the free water fraction and other diffusivities was investigated by simulating perfusion in diffusion MRI data. The perfusion effect in the simulations was significant, especially for the estimation of the free water fraction, and was maintained as long as low b-value data were included in the analysis. Two approaches to reduce the perfusion effect were explored in this study: (i) increasing the minimal b-value used in the fitting, and (ii) using a three-compartment model that explicitly accounts for water molecules in the capillary blood. Estimation of the model parameters while excluding low b-values reduced the perfusion effect but was highly sensitive to noise. The three-compartment model fit was more stable and additionally, provided an estimation of the volume fraction of the capillary blood compartment. The three-compartment model thus disentangles the effects of free water diffusion and perfusion, which is of major clinical importance since changes in these components in the brain may indicate different pathologies, i.e., those originating from the extracellular space, such as neuroinflammation and atrophy, and those related to the vascular space, such as vasodilation, vasoconstriction and capillary density. Diffusion MRI data acquired from a healthy volunteer, using multiple b-shells, demonstrated an expected non-zero contribution from the blood fraction, and indicated that not accounting for the perfusion effect may explain the overestimation of the free water fraction evinced in previous studies. Finally, the applicability of the method was demonstrated with a dataset acquired using a clinically feasible protocol with shorter acquisition time and fewer b-shells.
Zora Kikinis, Marc Muehlmann, Ofer Pasternak, Sharon Peled, Praveen Kulkarni, Craig Ferris, Sylvain Bouix, Yogesh Rathi, Inga K Koerte, Steve Pieper, Alexander Yarmarkovich, Caryn L Porter, Bruce S Kristal, and Martha E Shenton. 7/2017. “Diffusion Imaging of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the Impact Accelerated Rodent Model: A Pilot Study.” Brain Inj, 31, 10, Pp. 1376-81.Abstract
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: There is a need to understand pathologic processes of the brain following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Previous studies report axonal injury and oedema in the first week after injury in a rodent model. This study aims to investigate the processes occurring 1 week after injury at the time of regeneration and degeneration using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the impact acceleration rat mTBI model. RESEARCH DESIGN: Eighteen rats were subjected to impact acceleration injury, and three rats served as sham controls. Seven days post injury, DTI was acquired from fixed rat brains using a 7T scanner. Group comparison of Fractional Anisotropy (FA) values between traumatized and sham animals was performed using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS), a method that we adapted for rats. MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: TBSS revealed white matter regions of the brain with increased FA values in the traumatized versus sham rats, localized mainly to the contrecoup region. Regions of increased FA included the pyramidal tract, the cerebral peduncle, the superior cerebellar peduncle and to a lesser extent the fibre tracts of the corpus callosum, the anterior commissure, the fimbria of the hippocampus, the fornix, the medial forebrain bundle and the optic chiasm. CONCLUSION: Seven days post injury, during the period of tissue reparation in the impact acceleration rat model of mTBI, microstructural changes to white matter can be detected using DTI.
Markus Nilsson, Samo Lasič, Ivana Drobnjak, Daniel Topgaard, and Carl-Fredrik Westin. 7/2017. “Resolution Limit of Cylinder Diameter Estimation by Diffusion MRI: The Impact of Gradient Waveform and Orientation Dispersion.” NMR Biomed, 30, 7.Abstract
Diffusion MRI has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for axonal diameter mapping. However, accurate estimation of small diameters requires strong gradients, which is a challenge for the transition of the technique from preclinical to clinical MRI scanners, since these have weaker gradients. In this work, we develop a framework to estimate the lower bound for accurate diameter estimation, which we refer to as the resolution limit. We analyse only the contribution from the intra-axonal space and assume that axons can be represented by impermeable cylinders. To address the growing interest in using techniques for diffusion encoding that go beyond the conventional single diffusion encoding (SDE) sequence, we present a generalised analysis capable of predicting the resolution limit regardless of the gradient waveform. Using this framework, waveforms were optimised to minimise the resolution limit. The results show that, for parallel cylinders, the SDE experiment is optimal in terms of yielding the lowest possible resolution limit. In the presence of orientation dispersion, diffusion encoding sequences with square-wave oscillating gradients were optimal. The resolution limit for standard clinical MRI scanners (maximum gradient strength 60-80 mT/m) was found to be between 4 and 8 μm, depending on the noise levels and the level of orientation dispersion. For scanners with a maximum gradient strength of 300 mT/m, the limit was reduced to between 2 and 5 μm.
M Zhang, R Liao, Adrian V Dalca, E Turk, J Luo, E Grant, and Polina Golland. 6/2017. “Frequency Diffeomorphisms for Efficient Image Registration.” Inf Process Med Imaging., 10265, Pp. 559-70.

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