Publications by Year: 2000

2000
Yoshio Hirayasu, Robert W McCarley, Dean F Salisbury, Shin Tanaka, Jun Soo Kwon, Melissa Frumin, Danielle Snyderman, Deborah Yurgelun-Todd, Ron Kikinis, Ferenc A Jolesz, and Martha E Shenton. 7/2000. “Planum Temporale and Heschl Gyrus Volume Reduction in Schizophrenia: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of First Episode Patients.” Arch Gen Psychiatry, 57, 7, Pp. 692-9.Abstract

BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging studies in schizophrenia have revealed abnormalities in temporal lobe structures, including the superior temporal gyrus. More specifically, abnormalities have been reported in the posterior superior temporal gyrus, which includes the Heschl gyrus and planum temporale, the latter being an important substrate for language. However, the specificity of the Heschl gyrus and planum temporale structural abnormalities to schizophrenia vs affective psychosis, and the possible confounding roles of chronic morbidity and neuroleptic treatment, remain unclear. METHODS: Magnetic resonance images were acquired using a 1.5-T magnet from 20 first-episode (at first hospitalization) patients with schizophrenia (mean age, 27.3 years), 24 first-episode patients with manic psychosis (mean age, 23.6 years), and 22 controls (mean age, 24.5 years). There was no significant difference in age for the 3 groups. All brain images were uniformly aligned and then reformatted and resampled to yield isotropic voxels. RESULTS: Gray matter volume of the left planum temporale differed among the 3 groups. The patients with schizophrenia had significantly smaller left planum temporale volume than controls (20.0%) and patients with mania (20.0%). Heschl gyrus gray matter volume (left and right) was also reduced in patients with schizophrenia compared with controls (13.1%) and patients with bipolar mania (16.8%). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with controls and patients with bipolar manic psychosis, patients with first-episode schizophrenia showed left planum temporale gray matter volume reduction and bilateral Heschl gyrus gray matter volume reduction. These findings are similar to those reported in patients with chronic schizophrenia and suggest that such abnormalities are present at first episode and are specific to schizophrenia.

Nobuhiko Hata, Arya Nabavi, William M Wells III, Simon K Warfield, Ron Kikinis, Peter M Black, and Ferenc A Jolesz. 7/2000. “Three-dimensional Optical Flow Method for Measurement of Volumetric Brain Deformation from Intraoperative MR Images.” J Comput Assist Tomogr, 24, 4, Pp. 531-8.Abstract

A three-dimensional optical flow method to measure volumetric brain deformation from sequential intraoperative MR images and preliminary clinical results from five cases are reported. Intraoperative MR images were scanned before and after dura opening, twice during tumor resection, and immediately after dura closure. The maximum cortical surface shift measured was 11 mm and subsurface shift was 4 mm. The computed deformation field was most satisfactory when the skin was segmented and removed from the images before the optical flow computation.

Carl-Fredrik Westin, Jens Richolt, Vik Moharir, and Ron Kikinis. 6/2000. “Affine Adaptive Filtering of CT Data.” Med Image Anal, 4, 2, Pp. 161-77.Abstract

A novel method for resampling and enhancing image data using multidimensional adaptive filters is presented. The underlying issue that this paper addresses is segmentation of image structures that are close in size to the voxel geometry. Adaptive filtering is used to reduce both the effects of partial volume averaging by resampling the data to a lattice with higher sample density and to reduce the image noise level. Resampling is achieved by constructing filter sets that have subpixel offsets relative to the original sampling lattice. The filters are also frequency corrected for ansisotropic voxel dimensions. The shift and the voxel dimensions are described by an affine transform and provides a model for tuning the filter frequency functions. The method has been evaluated on CT data where the voxels are in general non cubic. The in-plane resolution in CT image volumes is often higher by a factor of 3-10 than the through-plane resolution. The method clearly shows an improvement over conventional resampling techniques such as cubic spline interpolation and sinc interpolation.

Charles RG Guttmann, Randall R Benson, Simon K Warfield, Xingchang Wei, Mark C Anderson, Charles B Hall, K Abu-Hasaballah, John P Mugler, and Lesley I Wolfson. 3/2000. “White Matter Abnormalities in Mobility-impaired Older Persons.” Neurology, 54, 6, Pp. 1277-83.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between white matter abnormalities and impairment of gait and balance in older persons. METHODS: Quantitative MRI was used to evaluate the brain tissue compartments of 28 older individuals separated into normal and impaired groups on the basis of mobility performance testing using the Short Physical Performance Battery. In addition, individuals were tested on six indices of gait and balance. For imaging data, segmentation of intracranial volume into four tissue classes was performed using template-driven segmentation, in which signal-intensity-based statistical tissue classification is refined using a digital brain atlas as anatomic template. RESULTS: Both decreased white matter volume, which was age-related, and increased white matter signal abnormalities, which were not age-related, were observed in the mobility-impaired group compared with the control subjects. The average volume of white matter signal abnormalities for impaired individuals was nearly double that of control subjects. CONCLUSIONS: This cross-sectional study suggests that decreased white matter volume is age-related, whereas increased white matter signal abnormalities are most likely to occur as a result of disease. Both of these changes are independently associated with impaired mobility in older persons and therefore likely to be additive factors of motor disability.
Joachim Kettenbach, Daniel F Kacher, Seppo K Koskinen, Silverman Stu G, Arya Nabavi, David Gering, Clare M Tempany, Richard Schwartz, Ron Kikinis, Peter M Black, and Ferenc A Jolesz. 1/2000. “Interventional and Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging.” Annu Rev Biomed Eng, 2, Pp. 661-90.Abstract

The goal of the Image Guided Therapy Program, as the name implies, is to develop the use of imaging to guide minimally invasive therapy. The program combines interventional and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high-performance computing and novel therapeutic devices. In clinical practice the multidisciplinary program provides for the investigation of a wide range of interventional and surgical procedures. The Signa SP 0.5 T superconducting MRI system (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) has a 56-cm-wide vertical gap, allowing access to the patient and permitting the execution of interactive MRI-guided procedures. This system is integrated with an optical tracking system and utilizes flexible surface coils and MRI-compatible displays to facilitate procedures. Images are obtained with routine pulse sequences. Nearly real-time imaging, with fast gradient-recalled echo sequences, may be acquired at a rate of one image every 1.5 s with interactive image plane selection. Since 1994, more than 800 of these procedures, including various percutaneous procedures and open surgeries, have been successfully performed at Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston, MA).

Simon K Warfield, Michael R Kaus, Ferenc A Jolesz, and Ron Kikinis. 2000. “Adaptive, Template Moderated, Spatially Varying Statistical Classification.” Med Image Anal, 4, 1, Pp. 43-55.Abstract

A novel image segmentation algorithm was developed to allow the automatic segmentation of both normal and abnormal anatomy from medical images. The new algorithm is a form of spatially varying statistical classification, in which an explicit anatomical template is used to moderate the segmentation obtained by statistical classification. The algorithm consists of an iterated sequence of spatially varying classification and nonlinear registration, which forms an adaptive, template moderated (ATM), spatially varying statistical classification (SVC). Classification methods and nonlinear registration methods are often complementary, both in the tasks where they succeed and in the tasks where they fail. By integrating these approaches the new algorithm avoids many of the disadvantages of each approach alone while exploiting the combination. The ATM SVC algorithm was applied to several segmentation problems, involving different image contrast mechanisms and different locations in the body. Segmentation and validation experiments were carried out for problems involving the quantification of normal anatomy (MRI of brains of neonates) and pathology of various types (MRI of patients with multiple sclerosis, MRI of patients with brain tumors, MRI of patients with damaged knee cartilage). In each case, the ATM SVC algorithm provided a better segmentation than statistical classification or elastic matching alone.

Arya Nabavi, Tallal Charles Mamisch, David Gering, Daniel F Kacher, Richard S Pergolizzi, William M Wells, Ron Kikinis, Peter M Black, and Ferenc A Jolesz. 2000. “Image-guided Therapy and Intraoperative MRI in Neurosurgery.” Minim Invasive Ther Allied Technol, 9, 3-4, Pp. 277-86.Abstract
Computer-assisted 3D planning, navigation and the possibilities offered by intra-operative imaging updates have made a large impact on neurological surgery. Three-dimensional rendering of complex medical image information, as well as co-registration of multimodal sources has reached a highly sophisticated level. When introduced into surgical navigation however, this pre-operative data is unable to account for intra-operative changes, ('brain-shift'). To update structural information during surgery, an open-configured, intra-operative MRI (Signa SP, 0.5 T) was realised at our institution in 1995. The design, advantages, limitations and current applications of this system are discussed, with emphasis on the integration of imaging into procedures. We also introduce our integrated platform for intra-operative visualisation and navigation, the 3D Slicer.