Publications by Year: 2016

2016
C. Wang, F Ji, Z Hong, JS Poh, R. Krishnan, J. Lee, G Rekhi, RSE Keefe, RA Adcock, SJ Wood, Alex Fornito, Ofer Pasternak, MW Chee, and J Zhou. 2016. “Disrupted Salience Network Functional Connectivity and White-Matter Microstructure in Persons at Risk For Psychosis: Findings from the LYRIKS Study.” Psychol Med, 46, 13, Pp. 2771-83.Abstract

BACKGROUND: Salience network (SN) dysconnectivity has been hypothesized to contribute to schizophrenia. Nevertheless, little is known about the functional and structural dysconnectivity of SN in subjects at risk for psychosis. We hypothesized that SN functional and structural connectivity would be disrupted in subjects with At-Risk Mental State (ARMS) and would be associated with symptom severity and disease progression. METHOD: We examined 87 ARMS and 37 healthy participants using both resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Group differences in SN functional and structural connectivity were examined using a seed-based approach and tract-based spatial statistics. Subject-level functional connectivity measures and diffusion indices of disrupted regions were correlated with CAARMS scores and compared between ARMS with and without transition to psychosis. RESULTS: ARMS subjects exhibited reduced functional connectivity between the left ventral anterior insula and other SN regions. Reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial diffusivity were also found along white-matter tracts in close proximity to regions of disrupted functional connectivity, including frontal-striatal-thalamic circuits and the cingulum. FA measures extracted from these disrupted white-matter regions correlated with individual symptom severity in the ARMS group. Furthermore, functional connectivity between the bilateral insula and FA at the forceps minor were further reduced in subjects who transitioned to psychosis after 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the insular dysconnectivity of the proximal SN hypothesis in the early stages of psychosis. Further developed, the combined structural and functional SN assays may inform the prognosis of persons at-risk for psychosis.

Zhang Fan, Savadjev Peter, Weidong Cai, Yang Song, Ragini Verma, Westin Carl-Fredrik, and Lauren J O'Donnell. 2016. “Fiber Clustering Based White Matter Connectivity Analysis for Prediction of Autism Spectrum Disorder using Diffusion Tensor Imaging.” IEEE Int Symp Biomed Imaging.Abstract
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been suggested to associate with alterations in brain connectivity. In this study, we focus on a fiber clustering tractography segmentation strategy to observe white matter connectivity alterations in ASD. Compared to another popular parcellation-based approach for tractography segmentation based on cortical regions, we hypothesized that the clustering-based method could provide a more anatomically correspondent division of white matter. We applied this strategy to conduct a population-based group statistical analysis for the automated prediction of ASD. We obtained a maximum classification accuracy of 81.33% be- tween ASDs and controls, compared to the results of 78.00% from the parcellation-based method.
 
Zhang ISBI 2016
Georg Langs, Danhong Wang, Polina Golland, Sophia Mueller, Ruiqi Pan, Mert R Sabuncu, Wei Sun, Kuncheng Li, and Hesheng Liu. 2016. “Identifying Shared Brain Networks in Individuals by Decoupling Functional and Anatomical Variability.” Cereb Cortex, 26, 10, Pp. 4004-14.Abstract
The connectivity architecture of the human brain varies across individuals. Mapping functional anatomy at the individual level is challenging, but critical for basic neuroscience research and clinical intervention. Using resting-state functional connectivity, we parcellated functional systems in an "embedding space" based on functional characteristics common across the population, while simultaneously accounting for individual variability in the cortical distribution of functional units. The functional connectivity patterns observed in resting-state data were mapped in the embedding space and the maps were aligned across individuals. A clustering algorithm was performed on the aligned embedding maps and the resulting clusters were transformed back to the unique anatomical space of each individual. This novel approach identified functional systems that were reproducible within subjects, but were distributed across different anatomical locations in different subjects. Using this approach for intersubject alignment improved the predictability of individual differences in language laterality when compared with anatomical alignment alone. Our results further revealed that the strength of association between function and macroanatomy varied across the cortex, which was strong in unimodal sensorimotor networks, but weak in association networks.
Ofer Pasternak, Marek Kubicki, and Martha E Shenton. 2016. “In vivo Imaging of Neuroinflammation in Schizophrenia.” Schizophr Res, 173, 3, Pp. 200-12.Abstract

In recent years evidence has accumulated to suggest that neuroinflammation might be an early pathology of schizophrenia that later leads to neurodegeneration, yet the exact role in the etiology, as well as the source of neuroinflammation, are still not known. The hypothesis of neuroinflammation involvement in schizophrenia is quickly gaining popularity, and thus it is imperative that we have reliable and reproducible tools and measures that are both sensitive, and, most importantly, specific to neuroinflammation. The development and use of appropriate human in vivo imaging methods can help in our understanding of the location and extent of neuroinflammation in different stages of the disorder, its natural time-course, and its relation to neurodegeneration. Thus far, there is little in vivo evidence derived from neuroimaging methods. This is likely the case because the methods that are specific and sensitive to neuroinflammation are relatively new or only just being developed. This paper provides a methodological review of both existing and emerging positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging techniques that identify and characterize neuroinflammation. We describe \how these methods have been used in schizophrenia research. We also outline the shortcomings of existing methods, and we highlight promising future techniques that will likely improve state-of-the-art neuroimaging as a more refined approach for investigating neuroinflammation in schizophrenia.

Qiuyun Fan, Thomas Witzel, Aapo Nummenmaa, Koene RA Van Dijk, John D Van Horn, Michelle K Drews, Leah H Somerville, Margaret A Sheridan, Rosario M Santillana, Jenna Snyder, Trey Hedden, Emily E Shaw, Marisa O Hollinshead, Ville Renvall, Roberta Zanzonico, Boris Keil, Stephen Cauley, Jonathan R Polimeni, Dylan Tisdall, Randy L Buckner, Van J Wedeen, Lawrence L Wald, Arthur W Toga, and Bruce R Rosen. 2016. “MGH-USC Human Connectome Project Datasets with Ultra-high b-value Diffusion MRI.” Neuroimage, 124, Pt B, Pp. 1108-14.Abstract
The MGH-USC CONNECTOM MRI scanner housed at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is a major hardware innovation of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). The 3T CONNECTOM scanner is capable of producing a magnetic field gradient of up to 300 mT/m strength for in vivo human brain imaging, which greatly shortens the time spent on diffusion encoding, and decreases the signal loss due to T2 decay. To demonstrate the capability of the novel gradient system, data of healthy adult participants were acquired for this MGH-USC Adult Diffusion Dataset (N=35), minimally preprocessed, and shared through the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging Image Data Archive (LONI IDA) and the WU-Minn Connectome Database (ConnectomeDB). Another purpose of sharing the data is to facilitate methodological studies of diffusion MRI (dMRI) analyses utilizing high diffusion contrast, which perhaps is not easily feasible with standard MR gradient system. In addition, acquisition of the MGH-Harvard-USC Lifespan Dataset is currently underway to include 120 healthy participants ranging from 8 to 90 years old, which will also be shared through LONI IDA and ConnectomeDB. Here we describe the efforts of the MGH-USC HCP consortium in acquiring and sharing the ultra-high b-value diffusion MRI data and provide a report on data preprocessing and access. We conclude with a demonstration of the example data, along with results of standard diffusion analyses, including q-ball Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) reconstruction and tractography.
Daniel S Margulies, Satrajit S Ghosh, Alexandros Goulas, Marcel Falkiewicz, Julia M Huntenburg, Georg Langs, Gleb Bezgin, Simon B Eickhoff, Xavier F Castellanos, Michael Petrides, Elizabeth Jefferies, and Jonathan Smallwood. 2016. “Situating the Default-mode Network along a Principal Gradient of Macroscale Cortical Organization.” Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 113, 44, Pp. 12574-9.Abstract

Understanding how the structure of cognition arises from the topographical organization of the cortex is a primary goal in neuroscience. Previous work has described local functional gradients extending from perceptual and motor regions to cortical areas representing more abstract functions, but an overarching framework for the association between structure and function is still lacking. Here, we show that the principal gradient revealed by the decomposition of connectivity data in humans and the macaque monkey is anchored by, at one end, regions serving primary sensory/motor functions and at the other end, transmodal regions that, in humans, are known as the default-mode network (DMN). These DMN regions exhibit the greatest geodesic distance along the cortical surface-and are precisely equidistant-from primary sensory/motor morphological landmarks. The principal gradient also provides an organizing spatial framework for multiple large-scale networks and characterizes a spectrum from unimodal to heteromodal activity in a functional metaanalysis. Together, these observations provide a characterization of the topographical organization of cortex and indicate that the role of the DMN in cognition might arise from its position at one extreme of a hierarchy, allowing it to process transmodal information that is unrelated to immediate sensory input.

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