Publications by Year: 2013

2013
Archana Venkataraman, Marek Kubicki, and Polina Golland. 11/2013. “From Connectivity Models to Region Labels: Identifying Foci of a Neurological Disorder.” IEEE Trans Med Imaging, 32, 11, Pp. 2078-98.Abstract

We propose a novel approach to identify the foci of a neurological disorder based on anatomical and functional connectivity information. Specifically, we formulate a generative model that characterizes the network of abnormal functional connectivity emanating from the affected foci. This allows us to aggregate pairwise connectivity changes into a region-based representation of the disease. We employ the variational expectation-maximization algorithm to fit the model and subsequently identify both the afflicted regions and the differences in connectivity induced by the disorder. We demonstrate our method on a population study of schizophrenia.

Yogesh Rathi, Borjan Gagoski, Kawin Setsompop, Ellen P Grant, and Westin Carl-Fredrik. 9/2013. “Comparing Simultaneous Multi-slice Diffusion Acquisitions.” Int Conf Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 16 (WS), Pp. 105-14.Abstract
Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is an important tool that allows non-invasive investigation of the neural architecture of the brain. Advanced dMRI protocols typically require a large number of measurements for accurately tracing the fiber bundles and estimating the diffusion properties (such as, FA). However, the acquisition time of these sequences is prohibitively large for pediatric as well as patients with certain types of brain disorders (such as, dementia). Thus, fast echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition sequences were proposed by the authors in [6, 16], which acquired multiple slices simultaneously to reduce scan time. The scan time in such cases drops proportionately to the number of simultaneous slice acquisitions (which we denote by R). While preliminary results in [6, 16] showed good reproducibility, yet the effect of simultaneous acquisitions on long range fiber connectivity and diffusion measures such as FA, is not known. In this work, we use multi-tensor based fiber connectivity to compare data acquired on two subjects with different acceleration factors (R = 1, 2, 3). We investigate and report the reproducibility of fiber bundles and diffusion measures between these scans on two subjects with different spatial resolutions, which is quite useful while designing neuroimaging studies.
Rathi MICCAI WS 2013
Yogesh Rathi, Marc Niethammer, Fredrik Laun, Kawin Setsompop, Oleg V Michailovich, Ellen P Grant, and Westin Carl-Fredrik. 9/2013. “Diffusion Propagator Estimation using Radial Basis Functions.” Int Conf Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 16 (WS), Pp. 161-70.Abstract
The average diffusion propagator (ADP) obtained from diffusion MRI (dMRI) data encapsulates important structural properties of the underlying tissue. Measures derived from the ADP can be potentially used as markers of tissue integrity in characterizing several mental disorders. Thus, accurate estimation of the ADP is imperative for its use in neuroimaging studies. In this work, we propose a simple method for estimating the ADP by representing the acquired diffusion signal in the entire q-space using radial basis functions (RBF). We demonstrate our technique using two different RBF’s (generalized inverse multiquadric and Gaussian) and derive analytical expressions for the corresponding ADP’s. We also derive expressions for computing the solid angle orientation distribution function (ODF) for each of the RBF’s. Estimation of the weights of the RBF’s is done by enforcing positivity constraint on the estimated ADP or ODF. Finally, we validate our method on data obtained from a physical phantom with known fiber crossing of 45 degrees and also show comparison with the solid spherical harmonics method of [7]. We also demonstrate our method on in-vivo human brain data.
Rathi MICCAI WS2 2013
Matthew Toews, Alexandra J Golby, and William M Wells III. 9/2013. “Inter-slice Correspondence for 2D Ultrasound-guided Procedures.” Int Conf Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. Workshop on Clinical Image-based Procedures: Transitional Research in Medical Imaging. 16 (WS).Abstract
This paper reports on a new computational methodology, inter-slice correspondence (ISC), for robustly aligning sets of 2D ultrasound (US) slices during image-guided medical procedures. Correspondences are derived from distinctive, local scale-invariant features, which are used in one-to-many matching of US slices in near real-time despite out-of-plane rotation, in addition to global in-plane similarity transforms, occlusion, missing tissue, US plane mirroring, changes in US probe depth settings. Experiments demonstrate that ISC can align manually-acquired US slices without probe tracking information in the context of image-guided neurosurgery, with an accuracy of 1.3mm. A novel reconstruction-without-calibration application based on ISC is proposed, where 3D US reconstruction results are very similar to those obtained via traditional phantom-based calibration.
Toews MICCAI WS 2013
Petter Risholm, Firdaus Janoos, Isaiah Norton, Alex J Golby, and William M Wells III. 7/2013. “Bayesian Characterization of Uncertainty in Intra-subject Non-rigid Registration.” Med Image Anal, 17, 5, Pp. 538-55.Abstract

In settings where high-level inferences are made based on registered image data, the registration uncertainty can contain important information. In this article, we propose a Bayesian non-rigid registration framework where conventional dissimilarity and regularization energies can be included in the likelihood and the prior distribution on deformations respectively through the use of Boltzmann's distribution. The posterior distribution is characterized using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods with the effect of the Boltzmann temperature hyper-parameters marginalized under broad uninformative hyper-prior distributions. The MCMC chain permits estimation of the most likely deformation as well as the associated uncertainty. On synthetic examples, we demonstrate the ability of the method to identify the maximum a posteriori estimate and the associated posterior uncertainty, and demonstrate that the posterior distribution can be non-Gaussian. Additionally, results from registering clinical data acquired during neurosurgery for resection of brain tumor are provided; we compare the method to single transformation results from a deterministic optimizer and introduce methods that summarize the high-dimensional uncertainty. At the site of resection, the registration uncertainty increases and the marginal distribution on deformations is shown to be multi-modal.

Jean-Jacques Lemaire, Alexandra Golby, William M Wells III, Sonia Pujol, Yanmei Tie, Laura Rigolo, Alexander Yarmarkovich, Steve Pieper, Carl-Fredrik Westin, Ferenc A Jolesz, and Ron Kikinis. 7/2013. “Extended Broca's Area in the Functional Connectome of Language in Adults: Combined Cortical and Subcortical Single-subject Analysis using fMRI and DTI Tractography.” Brain Topogr, 26, 3, Pp. 428-41.Abstract

Traditional models of the human language circuitry encompass three cortical areas, Broca's, Geschwind's and Wernicke's, and their connectivity through white matter fascicles. The neural connectivity deep to these cortical areas remains poorly understood, as does the macroscopic functional organization of the cortico-subcortical language circuitry. In an effort to expand current knowledge, we combined functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging to explore subject-specific structural and functional macroscopic connectivity, focusing on Broca's area. Fascicles were studied using diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking seeded from volumes placed manually within the white matter. White matter fascicles and fMRI-derived clusters (antonym-generation task) of positive and negative blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal were co-registered with 3-D renderings of the brain in 12 healthy subjects. Fascicles connecting BOLD-derived clusters were analyzed within specific cortical areas: Broca's, with the pars triangularis, the pars opercularis, and the pars orbitaris; Geschwind's and Wernicke's; the premotor cortex, the dorsal supplementary motor area, the middle temporal gyrus, the dorsal prefrontal cortex and the frontopolar region. We found a functional connectome divisible into three systems-anterior, superior and inferior-around the insula, more complex than previously thought, particularly with respect to a new extended Broca's area. The extended Broca's area involves two new fascicles: the operculo-premotor fascicle comprised of well-organized U-shaped fibers that connect the pars opercularis with the premotor region; and (2) the triangulo-orbitaris system comprised of intermingled U-shaped fibers that connect the pars triangularis with the pars orbitaris. The findings enhance our understanding of language function.

Matthew Toews, Lilla Zöllei, and William M Wells III. 6/2013. “Feature-based Alignment of Volumetric Multi-modal Images.” Inf Process Med Imaging, 23, Pp. 25-36.Abstract

This paper proposes a method for aligning image volumes acquired from different imaging modalities (e.g. MR, CT) based on 3D scale-invariant image features. A novel method for encoding invariant feature geometry and appearance is developed, based on the assumption of locally linear intensity relationships, providing a solution to poor repeatability of feature detection in different image modalities. The encoding method is incorporated into a probabilistic feature-based model for multi-modal image alignment. The model parameters are estimated via a group-wise alignment algorithm, that iteratively alternates between estimating a feature-based model from feature data, then realigning feature data to the model, converging to a stable alignment solution with few pre-processing or pre-alignment requirements. The resulting model can be used to align multi-modal image data with the benefits of invariant feature correspondence: globally optimal solutions, high efficiency and low memory usage. The method is tested on the difficult RIRE data set of CT, T1, T2, PD and MP-RAGE brain images of subjects exhibiting significant inter-subject variability due to pathology.

Ivan Kolesov, Peter Karasev, N Shusharina, Patricio Vela, Allen Tannenbaum, and Gregory Sharp. 6/2013. “Interactive Segmentation of Structures in the Head and Neck Using Steerable Active Contours.” Med Phys, 40, 6Part32, Pp. 536.Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this work is to investigate the performance of an interactive image segmentation method for radiotherapy contouring on computed tomography (CT) images. Manual segmentation is a time consuming task that is essential for treatment. Due to the low contrast of target structures, their similarity to surrounding tissue, and the required precision for the final segmentation Result, automatic methods do not exhibit robust performance. Furthermore, when an automatic segmentation algorithm produces errors at the structure boundary, they are tedious for a human user to correct. For this experiment, it is hypothesized that an interactive algorithm can attain ground truth results in a fraction of the the time needed for manual segmentation. METHODS: The proposed method is interactive segmentation that tightly couples a human "expert user" with a framework from computer vision called "active contours" to create a closed loop control system. As a Result, the strengths (i.e., quickly delineating complicated target boundaries) of the automatic method can be leveraged by the user, who guides the algorithm based on his expert knowledge throughout the process. Experimental segmentations have been performed both with and without the control system feedback, the accuracy of the resulting labels will be compared along with the time required to create the labels. RESULTS: Four structures were evaluated: left/right eye ball, brain stem, and mandible. Tests show that virtually identical segmentations are performed with and without control system feedback. However, the time required to complete the task is significantly less than what is needed for fully manual contouring. CONCLUSION: Interactive segmentation using control system feedback is shown to reduce the time and effort needed to segment targets in CT volumes of the head and neck region. 

Birkan Tunç, Alex R Smith, Demian Wasserman, Xavier Pennec, William M Wells III, Ragini Verma, and Kilian M Pohl. 6/2013. “Multinomial Probabilistic Fiber Representation for Connectivity Driven Clustering.” Inf Process Med Imaging, 23, Pp. 730-41.Abstract

The clustering of fibers into bundles is an important task in studying the structure and function of white matter. Existing technology mostly relies on geometrical features, such as the shape of fibers, and thus only provides very limited information about the neuroanatomical function of the brain. We advance this issue by proposing a multinomial representation of fibers decoding their connectivity to gray matter regions. We then simplify the clustering task by first deriving a compact encoding of our representation via the logit transformation. Furthermore, we define a distance between fibers that is in theory invariant to parcellation biases and is equivalent to a family of Riemannian metrics on the simplex of multinomial probabilities. We apply our method to longitudinal scans of two healthy subjects showing high reproducibility of the resulting fiber bundles without needing to register the corresponding scans to a common coordinate system. We confirm these qualitative findings via a simple statistical analyse of the fiber bundles.

Demian Wassermann, James Ross, George Washko, Carl-Fredrik Westin, and Raul San José Estépar. 4/2013. “Diffeomorphic Point Set Registration using Non-Stationary Mixture Models.” Proc IEEE Int Symp Biomed Imaging.Abstract

This paper investigates a diffeomorphic point-set registration based on non-stationary mixture models. The goal is to improve the non-linear registration of anatomical structures by representing each point as a general non-stationary kernel that provides information about the shape of that point. Our framework generalizes work done by others that use stationary models. We achieve this by integrating the shape at each point when calculating the point-set similarity and transforming it according to the calculated deformation. We also restrict the non-rigid transform to the space of symmetric diffeomorphisms. Our algorithm is validated in synthetic and human datasets in two different applications: fiber bundle and lung airways registration. Our results shows that non-stationary mixture models are superior to Gaussian mixture models and methods that do not take into account the shape of each point.

Matthew Toews and William M Wells III. 4/2013. “Efficient and Robust Model-to-image Alignment using 3D Scale-invariant Features.” Med Image Anal, 17, 3, Pp. 271-82.Abstract

This paper presents feature-based alignment (FBA), a general method for efficient and robust model-to-image alignment. Volumetric images, e.g. CT scans of the human body, are modeled probabilistically as a collage of 3D scale-invariant image features within a normalized reference space. Features are incorporated as a latent random variable and marginalized out in computing a maximum a posteriori alignment solution. The model is learned from features extracted in pre-aligned training images, then fit to features extracted from a new image to identify a globally optimal locally linear alignment solution. Novel techniques are presented for determining local feature orientation and efficiently encoding feature intensity in 3D. Experiments involving difficult magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain demonstrate FBA achieves alignment accuracy similar to widely-used registration methods, while requiring a fraction of the memory and computation resources and offering a more robust, globally optimal solution. Experiments on CT human body scans demonstrate FBA as an effective system for automatic human body alignment where other alignment methods break down.

Tina Kapur, Clare M. Tempany, and Ferenc A. Jolesz. 3/2013. “Proceedings of the 6th Image Guided Therapy Workshop.” Image Guided Therapy Workshop 6, Pp. 1-87. 2013 IGT Workshop Proceedings
Yi Gao, Allen Tannenbaum, Hao Chen, Mylin Torres, Emi Yoshida, Xiaofeng Yang, Yuefeng Wang, Walter Curran, and Tian Liu. 2013. “Automated skin segmentation in ultrasonic evaluation of skin toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy.” Ultrasound Med Biol, 39, 11, Pp. 2166-75.Abstract
Skin toxicity is the most common side effect of breast cancer radiotherapy and impairs the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. We, along with other researchers, have recently found quantitative ultrasound to be effective as a skin toxicity assessment tool. Although more reliable than standard clinical evaluations (visual observation and palpation), the current procedure for ultrasound-based skin toxicity measurements requires manual delineation of the skin layers (i.e., epidermis-dermis and dermis-hypodermis interfaces) on each ultrasound B-mode image. Manual skin segmentation is time consuming and subjective. Moreover, radiation-induced skin injury may decrease image contrast between the dermis and hypodermis, which increases the difficulty of delineation. Therefore, we have developed an automatic skin segmentation tool (ASST) based on the active contour model with two significant modifications: (i) The proposed algorithm introduces a novel dual-curve scheme for the double skin layer extraction, as opposed to the original single active contour method. (ii) The proposed algorithm is based on a geometric contour framework as opposed to the previous parametric algorithm. This ASST algorithm was tested on a breast cancer image database of 730 ultrasound breast images (73 ultrasound studies of 23 patients). We compared skin segmentation results obtained with the ASST with manual contours performed by two physicians. The average percentage differences in skin thickness between the ASST measurement and that of each physician were less than 5% (4.8 ± 17.8% and -3.8 ± 21.1%, respectively). In summary, we have developed an automatic skin segmentation method that ensures objective assessment of radiation-induced changes in skin thickness. Our ultrasound technology offers a unique opportunity to quantify tissue injury in a more meaningful and reproducible manner than the subjective assessments currently employed in the clinic.
Liangjia Zhu, Yi Gao, Vikram Appia, Anthony Yezzi, Chesnal Arepalli, Tracy Faber, Arthur Stillman, and Allen Tannenbaum. 2013. “Automatic delineation of the myocardial wall from CT images via shape segmentation and variational region growing.” IEEE Trans Biomed Eng, 60, 10, Pp. 2887-95.Abstract
Prognosis and diagnosis of cardiac diseases frequently require quantitative evaluation of the ventricle volume, mass, and ejection fraction. The delineation of the myocardial wall is involved in all of these evaluations, which is a challenging task due to large variations in myocardial shapes and image quality. In this paper, we present an automatic method for extracting the myocardial wall of the left and right ventricles from cardiac CT images. In the method, the left and right ventricles are located sequentially, in which each ventricle is detected by first identifying the endocardium and then segmenting the epicardium. To this end, the endocardium is localized by utilizing its geometric features obtained on-line from a CT image. After that, a variational region-growing model is employed to extract the epicardium of the ventricles. In particular, the location of the endocardium of the left ventricle is determined via using an active contour model on the blood-pool surface. To localize the right ventricle, the active contour model is applied on a heart surface extracted based on the left ventricle segmentation result. The robustness and accuracy of the proposed approach is demonstrated by experimental results from 33 human and 12 pig CT images.
Liangjia Zhu, Yi Gao, Anthony Yezzi, and Allen Tannenbaum. 2013. “Automatic segmentation of the left atrium from MR images via variational region growing with a moments-based shape prior.” IEEE Trans Image Process, 22, 12, Pp. 5111-22.Abstract
The planning and evaluation of left atrial ablation procedures are commonly based on the segmentation of the left atrium, which is a challenging task due to large anatomical variations. In this paper, we propose an automatic approach for segmenting the left atrium from magnetic resonance imagery. The segmentation problem is formulated as a problem in variational region growing. In particular, the method starts locally by searching for a seed region of the left atrium from an MR slice. A global constraint is imposed by applying a shape prior to the left atrium represented by Zernike moments. The overall growing process is guided by the robust statistics of intensities from the seed region along with the shape prior to capture the entire atrial region. The robustness and accuracy of our approach are demonstrated by experimental results from 64 human MR images.
Ahmed Mostayed, Revanth Reddy Garlapati, Grand Roman Joldes, Adam Wittek, Aditi Roy, Ron Kikinis, Simon K Warfield, and Karol Miller. 2013. “Biomechanical model as a registration tool for image-guided neurosurgery: evaluation against BSpline registration.” Ann Biomed Eng, 41, 11, Pp. 2409-25.Abstract
In this paper we evaluate the accuracy of warping of neuro-images using brain deformation predicted by means of a patient-specific biomechanical model against registration using a BSpline-based free form deformation algorithm. Unlike the BSpline algorithm, biomechanics-based registration does not require an intra-operative MR image which is very expensive and cumbersome to acquire. Only sparse intra-operative data on the brain surface is sufficient to compute deformation for the whole brain. In this contribution the deformation fields obtained from both methods are qualitatively compared and overlaps of Canny edges extracted from the images are examined. We define an edge based Hausdorff distance metric to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of registration for these two algorithms. The qualitative and quantitative evaluations indicate that our biomechanics-based registration algorithm, despite using much less input data, has at least as high registration accuracy as that of the BSpline algorithm.
John R Pani, Julia H Chariker, and Farah Naaz. 2013. “Computer-based learning: interleaving whole and sectional representation of neuroanatomy.” Anat Sci Educ, 6, 1, Pp. 11-8.Abstract
The large volume of material to be learned in biomedical disciplines requires optimizing the efficiency of instruction. In prior work with computer-based instruction of neuroanatomy, it was relatively efficient for learners to master whole anatomy and then transfer to learning sectional anatomy. It may, however, be more efficient to continuously integrate learning of whole and sectional anatomy. A study of computer-based learning of neuroanatomy was conducted to compare a basic transfer paradigm for learning whole and sectional neuroanatomy with a method in which the two forms of representation were interleaved (alternated). For all experimental groups, interactive computer programs supported an approach to instruction called adaptive exploration. Each learning trial consisted of time-limited exploration of neuroanatomy, self-timed testing, and graphical feedback. The primary result of this study was that interleaved learning of whole and sectional neuroanatomy was more efficient than the basic transfer method, without cost to long-term retention or generalization of knowledge to recognizing new images (Visible Human and MRI).
Andrea Mike, Erzsebet Strammer, Mihaly Aradi, Gergely Orsi, Gabor Perlaki, Andras Hajnal, Janos Sandor, Miklos Banati, Eniko Illes, Alexander Zaitsev, Robert Herold, Charles RG Guttmann, and Zsolt Illes. 2013. “Disconnection mechanism and regional cortical atrophy contribute to impaired processing of facial expressions and theory of mind in multiple sclerosis: a structural MRI study.” PLoS One, 8, 12, Pp. e82422.Abstract
Successful socialization requires the ability of understanding of others' mental states. This ability called as mentalization (Theory of Mind) may become deficient and contribute to everyday life difficulties in multiple sclerosis. We aimed to explore the impact of brain pathology on mentalization performance in multiple sclerosis. Mentalization performance of 49 patients with multiple sclerosis was compared to 24 age- and gender matched healthy controls. T1- and T2-weighted three-dimensional brain MRI images were acquired at 3Tesla from patients with multiple sclerosis and 18 gender- and age matched healthy controls. We assessed overall brain cortical thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis and the scanned healthy controls, and measured the total and regional T1 and T2 white matter lesion volumes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Performances in tests of recognition of mental states and emotions from facial expressions and eye gazes correlated with both total T1-lesion load and regional T1-lesion load of association fiber tracts interconnecting cortical regions related to visual and emotion processing (genu and splenium of corpus callosum, right inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus). Both of these tests showed correlations with specific cortical areas involved in emotion recognition from facial expressions (right and left fusiform face area, frontal eye filed), processing of emotions (right entorhinal cortex) and socially relevant information (left temporal pole). Thus, both disconnection mechanism due to white matter lesions and cortical thinning of specific brain areas may result in cognitive deficit in multiple sclerosis affecting emotion and mental state processing from facial expressions and contributing to everyday and social life difficulties of these patients.
Zora Kikinis, Nikos Makris, Christine T Finn, Sylvain Bouix, Diandra Lucia, Michael J Coleman, Erica Tworog-Dube, Ron Kikinis, Raju Kucherlapati, Martha E Shenton, and Marek Kubicki. 2013. “Genetic contributions to changes of fiber tracts of ventral visual stream in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.” Brain Imaging Behav, 7, 3, Pp. 316-25.Abstract
Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) represent a population at high risk for developing schizophrenia, as well as learning disabilities. Deficits in visuo-spatial memory are thought to underlie some of the cognitive disabilities. Neuronal substrates of visuo-spatial memory include the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), two tracts that comprise the ventral visual stream. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DT-MRI) is an established method to evaluate white matter (WM) connections in vivo. DT-MRI scans of nine 22q11.2DS young adults and nine matched healthy subjects were acquired. Tractography of the IFOF and the ILF was performed. DT-MRI indices, including Fractional anisotropy (FA, measure of WM changes), axial diffusivity (AD, measure of axonal changes) and radial diffusivity (RD, measure of myelin changes) of each of the tracts and each group were measured and compared. The 22q11.2DS group showed statistically significant reductions of FA in IFOF in the left hemisphere. Additionally, reductions of AD were found in the IFOF and the ILF in both hemispheres. These findings might be the consequence of axonal changes, which is possibly due to fewer, thinner, or less organized fibers. No changes in RD were detected in any of the tracts delineated, which is in contrast to findings in schizophrenia patients where increases in RD are believed to be indicative of demyelination. We conclude that reduced axonal changes may be key to understanding the underlying pathology of WM leading to the visuo-spatial phenotype in 22q11.2DS.
Peter Karasev, Ivan Kolesov, Karl Fritscher, Patricio Vela, Phillip Mitchell, and Allen Tannenbaum. 2013. “Interactive medical image segmentation using PDE control of active contours.” IEEE Trans Med Imaging, 32, 11, Pp. 2127-39.Abstract
Segmentation of injured or unusual anatomic structures in medical imagery is a problem that has continued to elude fully automated solutions. In this paper, the goal of easy-to-use and consistent interactive segmentation is transformed into a control synthesis problem. A nominal level set partial differential equation (PDE) is assumed to be given; this open-loop system achieves correct segmentation under ideal conditions, but does not agree with a human expert's ideal boundary for real image data. Perturbing the state and dynamics of a level set PDE via the accumulated user input and an observer-like system leads to desirable closed-loop behavior. The input structure is designed such that a user can stabilize the boundary in some desired state without needing to understand any mathematical parameters. Effectiveness of the technique is illustrated with applications to the challenging segmentations of a patellar tendon in magnetic resonance and a shattered femur in computed tomography.

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