Clinical application of curvilinear distraction osteogenesis for correction of mandibular deformities

Citation:

Kaban LB, Seldin EB, Kikinis R, Yeshwant K, Padwa BL, Troulis MJ. Clinical application of curvilinear distraction osteogenesis for correction of mandibular deformities. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2009;67 (5) :996-1008.

Date Published:

2009 May

Abstract:

PURPOSE: To report the use of a semiburied curvilinear distraction device, with a 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography treatment planning system, for correction of mandibular deformities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective evaluation of 13 consecutive patients, with syndromic and nonsyndromic micrognathia, who underwent correction by curvilinear distraction osteogenesis. A 3D computed tomography scan was obtained for each patient and imported into a 3D treatment planning system (Slicer/Osteoplan). Surgical guides were constructed to localize the osteotomy and to drill holes to secure the distractor's proximal and distal footplates to the mandible. Postoperatively, patients were followed by clinical examination and plain radiographs to ensure the desired vector of movement. At end distraction, when possible, a 3D computed tomography scan was obtained to document the final mandibular position. RESULTS: Of the 13 patients, 8 were females and 5 were males, with a mean age of 11.9 years (range 15 months to 39 years). All 13 underwent bilateral mandibular curvilinear distraction. Of the 13 patients, 8 were 16 years old or younger and 5 were younger than 6 years of age. The diagnoses included Treacher Collins syndrome (n = 3), Nager syndrome (n = 3), craniofacial microsomia (n = 2), post-traumatic ankylosis (n = 1), and micrognathia (syndromic, n = 3; nonsyndromic, n = 1). The correct distractor placement, vector of movement, and final mandibular position were achieved in 10 of 13 patients. In the other 3 patients, the desired jaw position was achieved by "molding" the regenerate. CONCLUSIONS: The use of a semiburied curvilinear distraction device, with 3D treatment planning, is a potentially powerful tool to correct complex mandibular deformities.
Last updated on 01/24/2017