An Anatomically Curated Fiber Clustering White Matter Atlas for Consistent White Matter Tract Parcellation across the Lifespan
An Immersive Virtual Reality Environment for Diagnostic Imaging
Inter-site and Inter-scanner Diffusion MRI Data Harmonization
The Open Anatomy Browser: A Collaborative Web-Based Viewer for Interoperable Anatomy Atlases
Unsupervised Discovery of Emphysema Subtypes in a Large Clinical Cohort
Identifying Shared Brain Networks in Individuals by Decoupling Functional and Anatomical Variability
Supra-Threshold Fiber Cluster Statistics for Data-Driven Whole Brain Tractography Analysis
Free Water Modeling of Peritumoral Edema using Multi-fiber Tractography
Estimation of Bounded and Unbounded Trajectories in Diffusion MRI
Principal Gradient of Macroscale Cortical Organization
Slide 10
Evolution of a Simultaneous Segmentation and Atlas Registration
Multi-modality MRI-based Atlas of the Brain
Intracranial Fluid Redistribution
Corticospinal Tract Modeling for Neurosurgical Planning by Tracking through Regions of Peritumoral Edema and Crossing Fibers
Automated White Matter Fiber Tract Identification in Patients with Brain Tumors
State-space Models of Mental Processes from fMRI
Robust Initialization of Active Shape Models for Lung Segmentation in CT Scans: A Feature-Based Atlas Approach
Tractography-driven Groupwise Multi-Scale Parcellation of the Cortex
Gray Matter Alterations in Early Aging
Statistical Shape Analysis: From Landmarks to Diffeomorphisms
A Generative Probabilistic Model and Discriminative Extensions for Brain Lesion Segmentation
Joint Modeling of Imaging and Genetic Variability
MR-Ultrasound Fusion for Neurosurgery
Diffusion MRI and Tumor Heterogeneity
SlicerDMRI: Open Source Diffusion MRI Software for Brain Cancer Research

Neuroimage Analysis Center

The Neuroimaging Analysis Center is a research and technology center with the mission of advancing the role of neuroimaging in health care. The ability to access huge cohorts of patient medical records and radiology data, the emergence of ever-more detailed imaging modalities, and the availability of unprecedented computer processing power marks the possibility for a new era in neuroimaging, disease understanding, and patient treatment. We are excited to present a national resource center with the goal of finding new ways of extracting disease characteristics from advanced imaging and computation, and to make these methods available to the larger medical community through a proven methodology of world-class research, open-source software, and extensive collaboration.

Our Sponsor

NIBIB

The NAC is a Biomedical Technology Resource Center supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) (P41 EB015902). It was supported by the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) (P41 RR13218) through December 2011.

Contact the Center Directors

Westin

Carl-Fredrik Westin, PhD
Laboratory of Mathematics in Imaging
Brigham and Women's Hospital
1249 Boylston St., Room 240
Boston, MA 02215
Phone: +1 617 525-6209
E-mail: westin at bwh.harvard.edu
 

Ron Kikinis

Ron Kikinis, MD
Surgical Planning Laboratory 
Brigham and Women's Hospital 
75 Francis St, L1 Room 050
Boston, MA 02115
Phone: +1 617 732-7389
E-mail: kikinis at bwh.harvard.edu
 

 

Recent Publications

  • Estepar RSJ, Stylopoulos N, Ellis RE, Samset E, Westin CF, Thompson C, Vosburgh K. Towards scarless surgery: an endoscopic-ultrasound navigation system for transgastric access procedures. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2006;9(Pt 1):445–53.
    Scarless surgery is a new and very promising technique that can mark a new era in surgical procedures. We have created and validated a navigation system for endoscopic and transgastric access interventions in in vivo pilot studies. The system provides augmented visual feedback and additional contextual information by establishing a correspondence between the real time endoscopic ultrasound image and a preoperative CT volume using rigid registration. The system enhances the operator’s ability to interpret the ultrasound image reducing the mental burden used in probe placement. Our analysis shows that rigid registration is accurate enough to help physicians in endoscopic abdominal surgery where, by using preoperative data for context and real-time imaging for targeting, distortions that limit the use of only preoperative data can be overcome.
  • Yang Y, George S, Martin DR, Tannenbaum AR, Giddens DP. 3D modeling of patient-specific geometries of portal veins using MR images. Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2006;1:5290–3.
    In this note, we present an approach for developing patient-specific 3D models of portal veins to provide geometric boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the blood flow inside portal veins. The study is based on MRI liver images of individual patients to which we apply image registration and segmentation techniques and inlet and outlet velocity profiles acquired using PC-MRI in the same imaging session. The portal vein and its connected veins are then extracted and visualized in 3D as surfaces. Image registration is performed to align shifted images between each breath-hold when the MRI images are acquired. The image segmentation method first labels each voxel in the 3D volume of interest by using a Bayesian probability approach, and then isolates the portal veins via active surfaces initialized inside the vessel. The method was tested with two healthy volunteers. In both cases, the main portal vein and its connected veins were successfully modeled and visualized.
  • Weisenfeld NI, Mewes AUJ, Warfield SK. Highly accurate segmentation of brain tissue and subcortical gray matter from newborn MRI. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2006;9(Pt 1):199–206.
    The segmentation of newborn brain MRI is important for assessing and directing treatment options for premature infants at risk for developmental disorders, abnormalities, or even death. Segmentation of infant brain MRI is particularly challenging when compared with the segmentation of images acquired from older children and adults. We sought to develop a fully automated segmentation strategy and present here a Bayesian approach utilizing an atlas of priors derived from previous segmentations and a new scheme for automatically selecting and iteratively refining classifier training data using the STAPLE algorithm. Results have been validated by comparison to hand-drawn segmentations.
  • Färneback G, Westin CF. Affine and deformable registration based on polynomial expansion. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2006;9(Pt 1):857–64.
    This paper presents a registration framework based on the polynomial expansion transform. The idea of polynomial expansion is that the image is locally approximated by polynomials at each pixel. Starting with observations of how the coefficients of ideal linear and quadratic polynomials change under translation and affine transformation, algorithms are developed to estimate translation and compute affine and deformable registration between a fixed and a moving image, from the polynomial expansion coefficients. All algorithms can be used for signals of any dimensionality. The algorithms are evaluated on medical data.
  • Nain D, Haker S, Bobick A, Tannenbaum A. Shape-driven 3D segmentation using spherical wavelets. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2006;9(Pt 1):66–74.
    This paper presents a novel active surface segmentation algorithm using a multiscale shape representation and prior. We define a parametric model of a surface using spherical wavelet functions and learn a prior probability distribution over the wavelet coefficients to model shape variations at different scales and spatial locations in a training set. Based on this representation, we derive a parametric active surface evolution using the multiscale prior coefficients as parameters for our optimization procedure to naturally include the prior in the segmentation framework. Additionally, the optimization method can be applied in a coarse-to-fine manner. We apply our algorithm to the segmentation of brain caudate nucleus, of interest in the study of schizophrenia. Our validation shows our algorithm is computationally efficient and outperforms the Active Shape Model algorithm by capturing finer shape details.