An Anatomically Curated Fiber Clustering White Matter Atlas for Consistent White Matter Tract Parcellation across the Lifespan
An Immersive Virtual Reality Environment for Diagnostic Imaging
Inter-site and Inter-scanner Diffusion MRI Data Harmonization
The Open Anatomy Browser: A Collaborative Web-Based Viewer for Interoperable Anatomy Atlases
Unsupervised Discovery of Emphysema Subtypes in a Large Clinical Cohort
Identifying Shared Brain Networks in Individuals by Decoupling Functional and Anatomical Variability
Supra-Threshold Fiber Cluster Statistics for Data-Driven Whole Brain Tractography Analysis
Free Water Modeling of Peritumoral Edema using Multi-fiber Tractography
Estimation of Bounded and Unbounded Trajectories in Diffusion MRI
Principal Gradient of Macroscale Cortical Organization
Slide 10
Evolution of a Simultaneous Segmentation and Atlas Registration
Multi-modality MRI-based Atlas of the Brain
Intracranial Fluid Redistribution
Corticospinal Tract Modeling for Neurosurgical Planning by Tracking through Regions of Peritumoral Edema and Crossing Fibers
Automated White Matter Fiber Tract Identification in Patients with Brain Tumors
State-space Models of Mental Processes from fMRI
Robust Initialization of Active Shape Models for Lung Segmentation in CT Scans: A Feature-Based Atlas Approach
Tractography-driven Groupwise Multi-Scale Parcellation of the Cortex
Gray Matter Alterations in Early Aging
Statistical Shape Analysis: From Landmarks to Diffeomorphisms
A Generative Probabilistic Model and Discriminative Extensions for Brain Lesion Segmentation
Joint Modeling of Imaging and Genetic Variability
MR-Ultrasound Fusion for Neurosurgery
Diffusion MRI and Tumor Heterogeneity
SlicerDMRI: Open Source Diffusion MRI Software for Brain Cancer Research

Neuroimage Analysis Center

The Neuroimaging Analysis Center is a research and technology center with the mission of advancing the role of neuroimaging in health care. The ability to access huge cohorts of patient medical records and radiology data, the emergence of ever-more detailed imaging modalities, and the availability of unprecedented computer processing power marks the possibility for a new era in neuroimaging, disease understanding, and patient treatment. We are excited to present a national resource center with the goal of finding new ways of extracting disease characteristics from advanced imaging and computation, and to make these methods available to the larger medical community through a proven methodology of world-class research, open-source software, and extensive collaboration.

Our Sponsor

NIBIB

The NAC is a Biomedical Technology Resource Center supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) (P41 EB015902). It was supported by the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) (P41 RR13218) through December 2011.

Contact the Center Directors

Westin

Carl-Fredrik Westin, PhD
Laboratory of Mathematics in Imaging
Brigham and Women's Hospital
1249 Boylston St., Room 240
Boston, MA 02215
Phone: +1 617 525-6209
E-mail: westin at bwh.harvard.edu
 

Ron Kikinis

Ron Kikinis, MD
Surgical Planning Laboratory 
Brigham and Women's Hospital 
75 Francis St, L1 Room 050
Boston, MA 02115
Phone: +1 617 732-7389
E-mail: kikinis at bwh.harvard.edu
 

 

News

Recent Publications

  • Kordelle J, Richolt JA, Millis M, Jolesz FA, Kikinis R. Development of the Acetabulum in Patients with Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: A Three-dimensional Analysis Based on Computed Tomography. J Pediatr Orthop. 2001;21(2):174–8.
    Orientation and shape of the acetabulum were determined by the use of three-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) data sets in 22 patients with a total of 30 slipped capital femoral epiphyses. We developed an interactive three-dimensional software program to measure the anteversion and inclination of the acetabulum without projectional and pelvis-tilting errors. Furthermore, we determined the height, width, depth, volume, and surface of the acetabulum as parameters describing the acetabular shape. Comparison of the affected side with the contralateral unaffected hip showed no significant differences for acetabular orientation and shape. The relationship between the degree of the slip and the acetabular orientation was calculated. No correlation was found. Based on the results of this study, we conclude that the slipping of the capital femoral epiphysis has no influence on acetabular development.
  • Gering D, Nabavi A, Kikinis R, Hata N, Donnell LJO, Grimson EL, Jolesz FA, Black PM, Wells WM III. An Integrated Visualization System for Surgical Planning and Guidance using Image Fusion and an Open MR. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2001;13(6):967–75.
    A surgical guidance and visualization system is presented, which uniquely integrates capabilities for data analysis and on-line interventional guidance into the setting of interventional MRI. Various pre-operative scans (T1- and T2-weighted MRI, MR angiography, and functional MRI (fMRI)) are fused and automatically aligned with the operating field of the interventional MR system. Both pre-surgical and intra-operative data may be segmented to generate three-dimensional surface models of key anatomical and functional structures. Models are combined in a three-dimensional scene along with reformatted slices that are driven by a tracked surgical device. Thus, pre-operative data augments interventional imaging to expedite tissue characterization and precise localization and targeting. As the surgery progresses, and anatomical changes subsequently reduce the relevance of pre-operative data, interventional data is refreshed for software navigation in true real time. The system has been applied in 45 neurosurgical cases and found to have beneficial utility for planning and guidance. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2001;13:967-975.
  • Kaus MR, Warfield SK, Nabavi A, Black PM, Jolesz FA, Kikinis R. Automated Segmentation of MR Images of Brain Tumors. Radiology. 2001;218(2):586–91.
    An automated brain tumor segmentation method was developed and validated against manual segmentation with three-dimensional magnetic resonance images in 20 patients with meningiomas and low-grade gliomas. The automated method (operator time, 5-10 minutes) allowed rapid identification of brain and tumor tissue with an accuracy and reproducibility comparable to those of manual segmentation (operator time, 3-5 hours), making automated segmentation practical for low-grade gliomas and meningiomas.
  • Jolesz FA, Nabavi A, Kikinis R. Integration of Interventional MRI with Computer-assisted Surgery. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2001;13(1):69–77.
    Interventional MRI (IMRI) has entered into a new stage in which computer-based techniques play an increasing role in planning, monitoring, and controlling the procedures. The use of interactive imaging, navigational image guidance techniques, and image processing methods is demonstrated in various applications. The integration of intraoperative MRI guidance and computer-assisted surgery will greatly accelerate the clinical utility of image-guided therapy in general and interventional MRI in particular. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2001;13:69-77.