An Anatomically Curated Fiber Clustering White Matter Atlas for Consistent White Matter Tract Parcellation across the Lifespan
An Immersive Virtual Reality Environment for Diagnostic Imaging
Inter-site and Inter-scanner Diffusion MRI Data Harmonization
The Open Anatomy Browser: A Collaborative Web-Based Viewer for Interoperable Anatomy Atlases
Unsupervised Discovery of Emphysema Subtypes in a Large Clinical Cohort
Identifying Shared Brain Networks in Individuals by Decoupling Functional and Anatomical Variability
Supra-Threshold Fiber Cluster Statistics for Data-Driven Whole Brain Tractography Analysis
Free Water Modeling of Peritumoral Edema using Multi-fiber Tractography
Estimation of Bounded and Unbounded Trajectories in Diffusion MRI
Principal Gradient of Macroscale Cortical Organization
Slide 10
Evolution of a Simultaneous Segmentation and Atlas Registration
Multi-modality MRI-based Atlas of the Brain
Intracranial Fluid Redistribution
Corticospinal Tract Modeling for Neurosurgical Planning by Tracking through Regions of Peritumoral Edema and Crossing Fibers
Automated White Matter Fiber Tract Identification in Patients with Brain Tumors
State-space Models of Mental Processes from fMRI
Robust Initialization of Active Shape Models for Lung Segmentation in CT Scans: A Feature-Based Atlas Approach
Tractography-driven Groupwise Multi-Scale Parcellation of the Cortex
Gray Matter Alterations in Early Aging
Statistical Shape Analysis: From Landmarks to Diffeomorphisms
A Generative Probabilistic Model and Discriminative Extensions for Brain Lesion Segmentation
Joint Modeling of Imaging and Genetic Variability
MR-Ultrasound Fusion for Neurosurgery
Diffusion MRI and Tumor Heterogeneity
SlicerDMRI: Open Source Diffusion MRI Software for Brain Cancer Research

Neuroimage Analysis Center

The Neuroimaging Analysis Center is a research and technology center with the mission of advancing the role of neuroimaging in health care. The ability to access huge cohorts of patient medical records and radiology data, the emergence of ever-more detailed imaging modalities, and the availability of unprecedented computer processing power marks the possibility for a new era in neuroimaging, disease understanding, and patient treatment. We are excited to present a national resource center with the goal of finding new ways of extracting disease characteristics from advanced imaging and computation, and to make these methods available to the larger medical community through a proven methodology of world-class research, open-source software, and extensive collaboration.

Our Sponsor

NIBIB

The NAC is a Biomedical Technology Resource Center supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) (P41 EB015902). It was supported by the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) (P41 RR13218) through December 2011.

Contact the Center Directors

Westin

Carl-Fredrik Westin, PhD
Laboratory of Mathematics in Imaging
Brigham and Women's Hospital
1249 Boylston St., Room 240
Boston, MA 02215
Phone: +1 617 525-6209
E-mail: westin at bwh.harvard.edu
 

Ron Kikinis

Ron Kikinis, MD
Surgical Planning Laboratory 
Brigham and Women's Hospital 
75 Francis St, L1 Room 050
Boston, MA 02115
Phone: +1 617 732-7389
E-mail: kikinis at bwh.harvard.edu
 

 

Recent Publications

  • Warfield SK, Zou KH, Wells WM III. Validation of Image Segmentation by Estimating Rater Bias and Variance. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2006;9(Pt 2):839–47.
    The accuracy and precision of segmentations of medical images has been difficult to quantify in the absence of a "ground truth" or reference standard segmentation for clinical data. Although physical or digital phantoms can help by providing a reference standard, they do not allow the reproduction of the full range of imaging and anatomical characteristics observed in clinical data. An alternative assessment approach is to compare to segmentations generated by domain experts. Segmentations may be generated by raters who are trained experts or by automated image analysis algorithms. Typically these segmentations differ due to intra-rater and inter-rater variability. The most appropriate way to compare such segmentations has been unclear. We present here a new algorithm to enable the estimation of performance characteristics, and a true labeling, from observations of segmentations of imaging data where segmentation labels may be ordered or continuous measures. This approach may be used with, amongst others, surface, distance transform or level set representations of segmentations, and can be used to assess whether or not a rater consistently over-estimates or under-estimates the position of a boundary.
  • Pohl KM, Fisher J, Shenton M, McCarley RW, Grimson EL, Kikinis R, Wells WM. Logarithm odds maps for shape representation. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2006;9(Pt 2):955–63.
    The concept of the Logarithm of the Odds (LogOdds) is frequently used in areas such as artificial neural networks, economics, and biology. Here, we utilize LogOdds for a shape representation that demonstrates desirable properties for medical imaging. For example, the representation encodes the shape of an anatomical structure as well as the variations within that structure. These variations are embedded in a vector space that relates to a probabilistic model. We apply our representation to a voxel based segmentation algorithm. We do so by embedding the manifold of Signed Distance Maps (SDM) into the linear space of LogOdds. The LogOdds variant is superior to the SDM model in an experiment segmenting 20 subjects into subcortical structures. We also use LogOdds in the non-convex interpolation between space conditioned distributions. We apply this model to a longitudinal schizophrenia study using quadratic splines. The resulting time-continuous simulation of the schizophrenic aging process has a higher accuracy then a model based on convex interpolation.
  • Ziyan U, Tuch D, Westin CF. Segmentation of thalamic nuclei from DTI using spectral clustering. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2006;9(Pt 2):807–14.
    Recent work shows that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can help resolving thalamic nuclei based on the characteristic fiber orientation of the corticothalamic/thalamocortical striations within each nucleus. In this paper we describe a novel segmentation method based on spectral clustering. We use Markovian relaxation to handle spatial information in a natural way, and we explicitly minimize the normalized cut criteria of the spectral clustering for a better optimization. Using this modified spectral clustering algorithm, we can resolve the organization of the thalamic nuclei into groups and subgroups solely based on the voxel affinity matrix, avoiding the need for explicitly defined cluster centers. The identification of nuclear subdivisions can facilitate localization of functional activation and pathology to individual nuclear subgroups.
  • Donnell LO, Westin CF. High-dimensional white matter atlas generation and group analysis. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2006;9(Pt 2):243–51.
    We present a two-step process including white matter atlas generation and automatic segmentation. Our atlas generation method is based on population fiber clustering. We produce an atlas which contains high-dimensional descriptors of fiber bundles as well as anatomical label information. We use the atlas to automatically segment tractography in the white matter of novel subjects and we present quantitative results (FA measurements) in segmented white matter regions from a small population. We demonstrate reproducibility of these measurements across scans. In addition, we introduce the idea of using clustering for automatic matching of anatomical structures across hemispheres.
  • Kindlmann G, Tricoche X, Westin CF. Anisotropy creases delineate white matter structure in diffusion tensor MRI. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2006;9(Pt 1):126–33.
    Current methods for extracting models of white matter architecture from diffusion tensor MRI are generally based on fiber tractography. For some purposes a compelling alternative may be found in analyzing the first and second derivatives of diffusion anisotropy. Anisotropy creases are ridges and valleys of locally extremal anisotropy, where the gradient of anisotropy is orthogonal to one or more eigenvectors of its Hessian. We propose that anisotropy creases provide a basis for extracting a skeleton of white matter pathways, in that ridges of anisotropy coincide with interiors of fiber tracts, and valleys of anisotropy coincide with the interfaces between adjacent but distinctly oriented tracts. We describe a crease extraction algorithm that generates high-quality polygonal models of crease surfaces, then demonstrate the method on a measured diffusion tensor dataset, and visualize the result in combination with tractography to confirm its anatomic relevance.