Publications by Year: 2014

2014
Gao Y, Zhu L, Norton I, Agar NYR, Tannenbaum A. Reconstruction and Feature Selection for Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectroscopy Imagery. Proc SPIE Int Soc Opt Eng. 2014;9036 :90360D.Abstract
Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) provides a highly sensitive imaging technique for differentiating normal and cancerous tissue at the molecular level. This can be very useful, especially under intra-operative conditions where the surgeon has to make crucial decision about the tumor boundary. In such situations, the time it takes for imaging and data analysis becomes a critical factor. Therefore, in this work we utilize compressive sensing to perform the sparse sampling of the tissue, which halves the scanning time. Furthermore, sparse feature selection is performed, which not only reduces the dimension of data from about 10(4) to less than 50, and thus significantly shortens the analysis time. This procedure also identifies biochemically important molecules for pathological analysis. The methods are validated on brain and breast tumor data sets.
Rathi Y, Ning L, Michailovich O, Liao HJ, Gagoski B, Grant EP, Shenton ME, Stern R, Westin C-F, Lin A. Maximum Entropy Estimation of Glutamate and Glutamine in MR Spectroscopic Imaging. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2014;17 (Pt 2) :749-56.Abstract
Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is often used to estimate the concentration of several brain metabolites. Abnormalities in these concentrations can indicate specific pathology, which can be quite useful in understanding the disease mechanism underlying those changes. Due to higher concentration, metabolites such as N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Creatine (Cr) and Choline (Cho) can be readily estimated using standard Fourier transform techniques. However, metabolites such as Glutamate (Glu) and Glutamine (Gln) occur in significantly lower concentrations and their resonance peaks are very close to each other making it difficult to accurately estimate their concentrations (separately). In this work, we propose to use the theory of 'Spectral Zooming' or high-resolution spectral analysis to separate the Glutamate and Glutamine peaks and accurately estimate their concentrations. The method works by estimating a unique power spectral density, which corresponds to the maximum entropy solution of a zero-mean stationary Gaussian process. We demonstrate our estimation technique on several physical phantom data sets as well as on in-vivo brain spectroscopic imaging data. The proposed technique is quite general and can be used to estimate the concentration of any other metabolite of interest.
Dalca AV, Sridharan R, Cloonan L, Fitzpatrick KM, Kanakis A, Furie KL, Rosand J, Wu O, Sabuncu M, Rost NS, et al. Segmentation 0f Cerebrovascular Pathologies in Stroke Patients with Spatial and Shape Priors. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2014;17 (Pt 2) :773-80.Abstract
We propose and demonstrate an inference algorithm for the automatic segmentation of cerebrovascular pathologies in clinical MR images of the brain. Identifying and differentiating pathologies is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and clinical outcomes of cerebral ischemia. Manual delineation of separate pathologies is infeasible in large studies of stroke that include thousands of patients. Unlike normal brain tissues and structures, the location and shape of the lesions vary across patients, presenting serious challenges for prior-driven segmentation. Our generative model captures spatial patterns and intensity properties associated with different cerebrovascular pathologies in stroke patients. We demonstrate the resulting segmentation algorithm on clinical images of a stroke patient cohort.
Batmanghelich KN, Cho M, Jose RS, Golland P. Spherical Topic Models for Imaging Phenotype Discovery in Genetic Studies. Bayesian Graph Models Biomed Imaging. 2014;8677 :107-17.Abstract
In this paper, we use Spherical Topic Models to discover the latent structure of lung disease. This method can be widely employed when a measurement for each subject is provided as a normalized histogram of relevant features. In this paper, the resulting descriptors are used as phenotypes to identify genetic markers associated with the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Features extracted from images capture the heterogeneity of the disease and therefore promise to improve detection of relevant genetic variants in Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Our generative model is based on normalized histograms of image intensity of each subject and it can be readily extended to other forms of features as long as they are provided as normalized histograms. The resulting algorithm represents the intensity distribution as a combination of meaningful latent factors and mixing co-efficients that can be used for genetic association analysis. This approach is motivated by a clinical hypothesis that COPD symptoms are caused by multiple coexisting disease processes. Our experiments show that the new features enhance the previously detected signal on chromosome 15 with respect to standard respiratory and imaging measurements.
Horky LL, Gerbaudo VH, Zaitsev A, Plesniak W, Hainer J, Govindarajulu U, Kikinis R, Dietrich J. Systemic chemotherapy decreases brain glucose metabolism. Ann Clin Transl Neurol. 2014;1 (10) :788-98.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Cancer patients may experience neurologic adverse effects, such as alterations in neurocognitive function, as a consequence of chemotherapy. The mechanisms underlying such neurotoxic syndromes remain poorly understood. We here describe the temporal and regional effects of systemically administered platinum-based chemotherapy on glucose metabolism in the brain of cancer patients. METHODS: Using sequential FDG-PET/CT imaging prior to and after administration of chemotherapy, we retrospectively characterized the effects of intravenously administered chemotherapy on brain glucose metabolism in a total of 24 brain regions in a homogenous cohort of 10 patients with newly diagnosed non-small-cell lung cancer. RESULTS: Significant alterations of glucose metabolism were found in response to chemotherapy in all gray matter structures, including cortical structures, deep nuclei, hippocampi, and cerebellum. Metabolic changes were also notable in frontotemporal white matter (WM) network systems, including the corpus callosum, subcortical, and periventricular WM tracts. INTERPRETATION: Our data demonstrate a decrease in glucose metabolism in both gray and white matter structures associated with chemotherapy. Among the affected regions are those relevant to the maintenance of brain plasticity and global neurologic function. This study potentially offers novel insights into the spatial and temporal effects of systemic chemotherapy on brain metabolism in cancer patients.
Wachinger C, Golland P. Atlas-based Under-segmentation. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2014;17 (Pt 1) :315-22.Abstract

We study the widespread, but rarely discussed, tendency of atlas-based segmentation to under-segment the organs of interest. Commonly used error measures do not distinguish between under- and over-segmentation, contributing to the problem. We explicitly quantify over- and under-segmentation in several typical examples and present a new hypothesis for the cause. We provide evidence that segmenting only one organ of interest and merging all surrounding structures into one label creates bias towards background in the label estimates suggested by the atlas. We propose a generative model that corrects for this effect by learning the background structures from the data. Inference in the model separates the background into distinct structures and consequently improves the segmentation accuracy. Our experiments demonstrate a clear improvement in several applications.

Wachinger C, Golland P, Reuter M. BrainPrint: Identifying Subjects by Their Brain. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2014;17 (Pt 3) :41-8.Abstract

Introducing BrainPrint, a compact and discriminative representation of anatomical structures in the brain. BrainPrint captures shape information of an ensemble of cortical and subcortical structures by solving the 2D and 3D Laplace-Beltrami operator on triangular (boundary) and tetrahedral (volumetric) meshes. We derive a robust classifier for this representation that identifies the subject in a new scan, based on a database of brain scans. In an example dataset containing over 3000 MRI scans, we show that BrainPrint captures unique information about the subject's anatomy and permits to correctly classify a scan with an accuracy of over 99.8%. All processing steps for obtaining the compact representation are fully automated making this processing framework particularly attractive for handling large datasets.

Wachinger C, Golland P, Reuter M, Wells III WM. Gaussian Process Interpolation for Uncertainty Estimation in Image Registration. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2014;17 (Pt 1) :267-74.Abstract

Intensity-based image registration requires resampling images on a common grid to evaluate the similarity function. The uncertainty of interpolation varies across the image, depending on the location of resampled points relative to the base grid. We propose to perform Bayesian inference with Gaussian processes, where the covariance matrix of the Gaussian process posterior distribution estimates the uncertainty in interpolation. The Gaussian process replaces a single image with a distribution over images that we integrate into a generative model for registration. Marginalization over resampled images leads to a new similarity measure that includes the uncertainty of the interpolation. We demonstrate that our approach increases the registration accuracy and propose an efficient approximation scheme that enables seamless integration with existing registration methods.

Gill G, Toews M, Beichel RR. Robust Initialization of Active Shape Models for Lung Segmentation in CT Scans: A Feature-Based Atlas Approach. Int J Biomed Imaging. 2014;2014 :479154.Abstract

Model-based segmentation methods have the advantage of incorporating a priori shape information into the segmentation process but suffer from the drawback that the model must be initialized sufficiently close to the target. We propose a novel approach for initializing an active shape model (ASM) and apply it to 3D lung segmentation in CT scans. Our method constructs an atlas consisting of a set of representative lung features and an average lung shape. The ASM pose parameters are found by transforming the average lung shape based on an affine transform computed from matching features between the new image and representative lung features. Our evaluation on a diverse set of 190 images showed an average dice coefficient of 0.746 ± 0.068 for initialization and 0.974 ± 0.017 for subsequent segmentation, based on an independent reference standard. The mean absolute surface distance error was 0.948 ± 1.537 mm. The initialization as well as segmentation results showed a statistically significant improvement compared to four other approaches. The proposed initialization method can be generalized to other applications employing ASM-based segmentation.

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