Sexually Dimorphic White Matter Geometry Abnormalities in Adolescent Onset Schizophrenia

Citation:

Peter Savadjiev, Thomas J Whitford, ME Hough, Christian Clemm von Hohenberg, Sylvain Bouix, Carl-Fredrik Westin, Martha E Shenton, Tim J Crow, James A, and Marek Kubicki. 2014. “Sexually Dimorphic White Matter Geometry Abnormalities in Adolescent Onset Schizophrenia.” Cereb Cortex, 24, 5, Pp. 1389-96.

Abstract:

The normal human brain is characterized by a pattern of gross anatomical asymmetry. This pattern, known as the "torque", is associated with a sexual dimorphism: The male brain tends to be more asymmetric than that of the female. This fact, along with well-known sex differences in brain development (faster in females) and onset of psychosis (earlier with worse outcome in males), has led to the theory that schizophrenia is a disorder in which sex-dependent abnormalities in the development of brain torque, the correlate of the capacity for language, cause alterations in interhemispheric connectivity, which are causally related to psychosis (Crow TJ, Paez P, Chance SE. 2007. Callosal misconnectivity and the sex difference in psychosis. Int Rev Psychiatry. 19(4):449-457.). To provide evidence toward this theory, we analyze the geometry of interhemispheric white matter connections in adolescent-onset schizophrenia, with a particular focus on sex, using a recently introduced framework for white matter geometry computation in diffusion tensor imaging data (Savadjiev P, Kindlmann GL, Bouix S, Shenton ME, Westin CF. 2010. Local white geometry from diffusion tensor gradients. Neuroimage. 49(4):3175-3186.). Our results reveal a pattern of sex-dependent white matter geometry abnormalities that conform to the predictions of Crow's torque theory and correlate with the severity of patients' symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to associate geometrical differences in white matter connectivity with torque in schizophrenia.

Last updated on 10/19/2017